Removing 1.5 Acres of Bamboo in Towson, MD

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Greetings all. A new property of my family's is covered by a massive stand of running bamboo. The lot is six acres rectangular, where about *one and a half* acres of the total acreage is covered by a very dense stand of running bamboo. It is 350 feet long deep at its longest dimension The plants have been there for decades, as the property was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. It is our intention to restore the property, inside and out.
Options for removal I've seen generally target small areas. However this is a much bigger problem! My first thought is to hire someone with a bulldozer to come push it all down, and then put it all in a commercial wood chipper. This could get expensive though. What else can we do? What problems does my scenario present? Hiring a panda bear would probably not go over well with the neighborhood.
The property is in Towson, Maryland.
Thank you in advance.
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if its big enough sell for wood.
basically a logger would clear the area for free, no cost to you and they would sell the lumber to whoever would buy it
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Can you burn it? MJ
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MJ, burning it is probably not an option in this suburban location as it is too close to nearby homes and other woods.
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On 2/6/12 10:58 AM, Elliott P wrote:

Burning will NOT kill the underground roots and runners.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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Are you allowed to clear cut the wooded/brush/bamboo area ?
Is it considered a "wet land" ?
You should check with your nearest conservation/environmental authorities to make sure you are allowed to cut all of that natural vegetation down without some kind of site plan/impact study done and having a permit hearing...
~~ Evan
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(rolling eyes)
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Roll your eyes all you want but if the DEC catches on to what you're doing, and it's not "legal," they can pretty much ruin you for life.
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Not saying that the OP doesn't need to do that (I've heard of dumber things) but bamboo has never been native to Maryland to my knowledge... you'd think the enviro types would be happy to see it go.
nate
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I had the same reaction as Ron when I read that post.
I don't think it is native anywhere on the continent. but then I hae been wrong once or twice in my life.
Harry K
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There are 3 species of Arundinaria native to the US, all in the SE/Appalachia area: A. appalachiana, A. gigantea, and A. tecta. That's all we've got for native bamboos. There are others in N America, in Mexico and Central America. Mexico, for instance, has 8 genera and 35 species.
If you want to know more: http://herbarium.usu.edu/webmanual /
Kay
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On 2/7/12 2:42 PM, Kay Lancaster wrote:

Actually, the Arundinoideae are not bamboos. They are reeds. None of the bamboo genera fall within that subfamily.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 2/7/12 7:40 PM, David E. Ross wrote:

Oops! Arundinaria are NOT part of the Arundinoideae. Instead, they are indeed bamboos.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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This came through after I found the initial statement... should have known you'd know when you stopped to think about it!
Kay
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["Followup-To:" header set to rec.gardens.]

Arundo is in the Arundinoideae; Arundinaria is in the Bambusoideae. I think you're confusing the two genera.
Arundinaria are the giant canes; they are found in N. America and S. Africa. When you read about canebrakes, they're talking about big stands of Arundinaria.
Kay

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why not leave the stand of bamboo by whatever name and resume donating it to feed pandas or other zoo animals?
this equals less grass to cut:)
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@Nate:
It might not be "native" to Maryland, but it is growing there on its own over a 1.5 acre area -- which makes it something that might require permission of/supervision from the AHJ or environmental/conservation authorities before you go about removing it on your own...
The nativity of a species of plant doesn't impact its vital role as a means of erosion control and as a water absorber...
Making major changes which effect erosion and water flow properties of most lands requires oversight -- it is the size of the area in which the OP seeks to modify that is really at issue...
~~ Evan
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On 2/10/2012 11:13 AM, Evan wrote: ...

...
I'd think it far more likely to be on a noxious weed list _requiring_ control than the converse...
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Evan wrote:

Were it protected land; water shed, riparian, wetlands, etc, the owner would know by perusing the property survey or simply phoning the town clerk. Such information is generally on line too as it's public record... they'd be able to say if there is a septic or utility line buried. Absent a body of water on that piece of land I seriously doubt that stand of bamboo is in any way protected... I have a 1/2 pond that I mow right to the edge each fall and cut out most of the catails. I'd just hack that basmboo down and do whatever it takes within legality (chems/fire) to be rid of it. With the right equipment it shouldn't take very long to cut, chip, plow, and rake that small plot, no more than 4 eight hour days and like 40 gallons of diesel. If kept closely mowed whatever roots remain will die off within a couple three seasons, I seriously doubt any defolient is necessary, just keep mowing, even if twice a week... with my 7' mower I can mow an acre in 20 minutes. I mow 10 acres of lawn every week, when weather is dry I can do it all in one day, and I have several separate areas, and lots of edging, miles of edging. With my brush hog I can chop down a 4 acre wildflower meadow in about four hours, typically 4'-6' tall:
http://i41.tinypic.com/18ndpg.jpg
http://i44.tinypic.com/15dto4h.jpg
http://i39.tinypic.com/2cygs4o.jpg
No problem with my finish mower either:
http://i44.tinypic.com/25ujfgj.jpg
http://i43.tinypic.com/1177lom.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/2pzy2s1.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/2yn19xu.jpg
After clearing wild turkeys have a feast:
http://i44.tinypic.com/2134qps.jpg
I can guarantee I'd have that bamboo gone in three days, all while in total A/C, dust-free comfort, with music blasting, wouldn't even work up a sweat.
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