Re: plane tree

Thank you for the advice. I am in Zone 7 - Dallas Ft. Worth metroplex. As long as we are above 0F (way above that any time of year here) do you think we're ok against cankerstain? Thanks again for any advice.
Sincerely, Adam

(Platinus
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 19:01:03 -0600, "Ken Smith"

you may be having trouble because in TX you'll hear it called Sycamore. If you actually want the specific tree called plane tree in Britain (and elsewhere?) I don't know how to help.
Keith For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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snipped-for-privacy@aroma-massage.com (Babberney) wrote:

London Planetree = Platanus x acerifolia American Sycamore = Platanus occidentalis
Unfortunately the American Sycamore is very susceptible to anthracnose, a fungal disease.
A preferred variety that is fairly disease resistant is Platanus x acerifolia "Bloodgood"
some sources are:
http://www.pickettsnurseries.com/shadetrees.html
http://youngsnurseries.com/acatalog/Young_s_Nursery_2003_Platanus_x_aceri folia_247.html
http://www.meadow-lake.com/shop/product.asp?dept_id=T&pf_id=TPLACB
http://www.louisiananursery.com/Trees%20and%20Shrubs%20Cat%20P1.htm
http://www.willamettenurseries.com/FruitTreeOrnamentalHardwoodCuttings.ht ml
http://www.craintreefarm.com/Shadetrees.htm
http://www.femrite.com/avail/numsearch.mv?4815
http://www.readscreeknursery.com/lists/trees.shtml
http://www.waterloogardens.com/care_sheets/cs_spec_cond/cs_clay_soil.htm
The last nursery is the only one I am familiar with, and it is a retail nursery near Philadelphia.
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Be aware that plane trees are very messy, dropping fruit and bark all around them. Also, the wood is brittle; they drop twigs and branches quite readily.
IIRC, London has banned any further planting of them because of the litter they produce.
The American sycamore, P. occidentalis, has the same bad features.
J. Del Col
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.ab.edu (J. Del Col) wrote:

Many urban planners like them because they drop the fruit with the leaves in a well defined period, so are easy to clean up around.
The branches that drop off are called by arborists as self-pruning.
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(J. Del Col) wrote:

around
readily.
This may be true in some areas, but in my community they are notorious for keeping their brown hard plasticky fall leaves for several months and dropping them slowly from October to mid December. However, I do think their patchy light grey bark and fairly light green leaves are very striking, and they make a dramatic, long-lived avenue tree. So, it's something of a trade-off. Maples are messy for a shorter period - but with their dark brown/grey bark are not as striking in the landscape. One nice advantage of London plane trees is that they can exist on much less water than many large decidious trees. (Or else they do a better job of finding it in sewer pipes...lol) .In my western climate, that's a definite advantage.
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