Re: Help for Wilting African Violet? ...



John and Tracy ...
Thanks so much for your responses.
The soil in the little pot is indeed quite wet, and so I think your overwatering theory is probably correct. I'm not even sure why I watered it so much, as I generally tend to let them get dry in between waterings.
John, the plant wasn't flowering at the time I watered it. In fact, I've put all three plants out on my balcony rather than in their usual location inside because I thought perhaps more light out there might encourage them to flower. The one in question hasn't flowered for years.
I don't have any extra soil on hand but if the soil the plant is in doesn't begin to get dryer today, I guess I will purchase some. Any suggestions on what to purchase? And I'll also see if I can start rooting a leaf, too.
I hope the plant will be able to dry out. As I said, it has sentimental value to me.
It would be fun if the plants would also flower (although I'll be happy if that one just dries out okay), but I'm not sure what else to do beyond trying to give them more light.
Thanks again for the help and suggestions!
Linda W.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Water from the bottom. Leave in a pan of water until it quits sucking it up, then remove it. It'll flower.
On 14 Jul 2003 10:34:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Linda W.) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AV's with proper soil, warm temperatures, fertilizer, light and water should have flushes of blooms every four to five months. Have you ever repotted them into high humus soils such as the types sold by Schultz or MiracleGro? In fact, most garden centers carry potting mixtures specifically designated for AV's. AV's like bright light but little sunlight, particularly in the summer. An east window in the winter is fine. They will also grow and bloom well under eight to ten hours of flourescent light a day if placed four to six inches beneath the light. Fertilize with a low nitrogen such as Schultz Bloom Plus (10-60-10) at half strength every other time you water. With this type of regimen your plants should thrive. It's also better to place a saucer underneath and water from the blottom. They develop water spots on the leaves if they become wet. BTW, I had a sad looking specimen, an Oprimara, thrust at me two months ago. It's now blossoming. I also have a leaf from it sending up plantlets.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BTW, AV's should be divided, if they develop more than one crown, and repotted every yearly. They respond well to fresh growing medium and you don't have to be too careful when you remove the old soil. Just be sure most of it is gone. I wash it off outside with a stream of water and repot immediately.

temperatures don't drop down into the fifties or low sixties at night. I have the leaf outside on the front porch, which faces north, and it's really beginning to grow.

each day. Bright light is a plus, but they really don't need intense light. Remember that they will also grow and bloom well under flourescent lights. I have the blooming one in a south window in our sun room at the moment, where it has warm temperatures and is getting very bright light but no sunlight at the moment because of an overhang. When the sun begins hitting it later in the season, I'll move it to an east window.

bad, but not quite as bad, as keeping them too wet. The leaves will let you know by becoming very tightly bunched, curly on the edges, and a dark, unhealthy green color. The optimum is moist, but not wet. You can tell by sticking your finger into the soil or do what I've learned to do when watering plants. If the pot is light when I pick up, it needs water. If it isn't, wait a couple days and check again.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AFs might go up to a 3.5 maybe 4" pot max, then that's it. They like a little more watering than most other plants. Sometimes you can get insect damage. The cyclamin mite is a tough one to deal with and usually means throwing out the plant to prevent spreading the disease.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.