Propagating Cuttings in Water -- Pineapple Mint Difficult

Hi,
Unlike other mints, the Pineapple Mint I bought did not spread, but instead stayed in one area. It came back for three years, but on the fourth way it split in two stems. One I planted in water and was successful, but I only had it left. It's about 16 inches long and is not branching. I'm wondering if I cut the top 8 inches off and put it in water if the very well rooted other part will continue to live.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Plants rooted in water are very difficult to pot up. The rootlets are too easily damaged when put into soil.
On the other hand, some plants rooted in water will survive a very long time that way. I have a philodendron in water that my mother started possibly 15 years ago. Since mint likes lots of water (sometimes growing in bogs) and doesn't need much nutrients, it could indeed be successful.
If a plant grows with a single stem and no branches, just pinch the tip (remove the terminal bud) to make it branch. Or you can cut it further down but above the bottom-most leaves.
Some plants, including lavender (a mint relative) die back if a stem is cut below the bottom-most leaves. If such a plant has only one stem, that will kill the plant.
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