Planting Eucalyptus trees

Hello,
I have 2 Eucalyptus trees which I would like to plant. One is 10cm (Pauciflora), the other is 70 cm (I know, rather tall allready, Perriniana). Are there any things I should take care off while planting those? We have rather fertile loam soil. I'm also thinking of making a fence of plastic arround them to protect them from cold wind when frost kicks in. I live in Belgium.
kind regards
Chris
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http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/tree_planting.aspx
highlights: dig the hole 3X the diameter of the rootball but only as deep as necessary (1X the depth of the rootball). Backfill with unamended native soil.
Make sure you do not plant the trees too deep. The current rootball may include soil above the trunk flares. If necessary, remove soil from the top of the rootball until flares are visible, then plant them at or slightly above grade level. This is very important to get the best results from your trees.
Staking may be needed for the taller tree, but do not wrap the staking material around the trunk (just around the back side and back to the stake). Otherwise, as the tree grows (expands in diameter) you get a similar effect to putting your neck in a noose and hanging. Flat webbing is better than string or wire (and a piece of garden hose with wire inside it is no better than wire alone). Remove staking after one year at the latest.
good luck,
Keith Babberney ISA Certified Arborist #TX-236
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Watch out for root-bound plants. Eucalyptus got a bad name in California for a while when people planted them from containers where they had become root-bound. They never developed strong roots and fell down a lot.
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Charles wrote:

What do you mean with root-bound plants exactly? They both came in their own pot.
Thx
Chris
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A plant that has been in the pot too long gets its roots wound around and won't grow out properlt.
Here's a picture: http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/planting/manyroots.htm
eucalyptus are especially prone to this as they are a fast growing tree. When the roots con't spread properly after they are planted they are prone to blowing down in a wind.
some info here:
http://www.angelfire.com/bc/eucalyptus/eucgrowth.html
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Ah oke. I planted mine yesterday and I didn't notice a pattern like this. The soil was pretty loose arround the roots when I took it out of the pot. I even didn't see any roots. So, I may presume they are oke?
Thx for the replies
Chris
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If the roots were not at the edge of the soil in the pot, then probably okay.
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CV wrote:

I bought them over the Internet and I think (I'm not sure) the guy kept them in his garden and transplanted them in the pot. This guy is one of few Eucalyptus breeders in my "area" (they come from the Netherlands) as far as I know. They where maximum 2 days in the pots (for transport) and they where packed very well. If it turns out that these trees are doomed to die. I will try again in spring to breed them from seeds.
Kind regards
Chris
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