Pick tomatoes green?

As posted earlier, my tomatoes this year are a disaster. Something got in them, probably brought home from nursery. That's what I get for buying plants instead of growing from seed. Fatal delay?
Question: If I pick the few remaining tomatoes green and let them ripen on the windowsill, will they still turn up infected & inedible? Or does the disease manifest itself only toward vine ripening time?
Any experience out there?
TIA
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Aug 2013 11:47:37 -0700, Higgs Boson wrote:

Tomatoes picked wholly green generally don't ripen, at least not with any real flavor. If they've become at least somewhat pale green they may turn color eventually, but still will never achieve that fully vine-ripened flavor. This is, of course, how most grocery-store fruit are picked (before shipping & ethylene gassing).
Keeping your fruit physically separate reduces the likelihood of disease transmission. At garden year's end I simply put them on a sheet of newspaper, spaced apart. Usually these last for ~2 months.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, August 12, 2013 12:55:06 PM UTC-7, cassiope wrote:

Sorry, don't understand. Could you explain.. you're putting picked fruit on newspapers or...?
TIA
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He said that if the tomatoes were turning yellow, you have a chance at shelf ripening them. A simpler approach would be to use them as you would tomatillos.
Authentic Enchiladas Verdes Ingredients Recipe makes 4 servings
    2 bone-in chicken breast halves     2 cups chicken broth     1/4 white onion     1 clove garlic     2 teaspoons salt     1 pound fresh tomatillos, husks removed     5 serrano peppers     1/4 white onion     1 clove garlic     1 pinch salt     12 corn tortillas     1/4 cup vegetable oil     1 cup crumbled queso fresco     1/2 white onion, chopped     1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped
Directions 1. In a saucepan, combine chicken breast with chicken broth, one quarter onion, a clove of garlic, and 2 teaspoons salt. Bring to a boil, and then boil for 20 minutes. Reserve broth, set chicken aside to cool, and discard onion and garlic. When cool enough to handle, shred chicken with your hands.
2. Place tomatillos and serrano chiles in a pot with water, enough to cover them. Bring to boil, and continue boiling until tomatillos turn a different shade of green (from bright green to a dull, army green). Strain tomatillos and chiles, and place in a blender with another quarter piece of onion, 1 clove garlic, and a pinch of salt. Pour in reserved chicken broth, so that liquid just covers the veggies in the blender by about an inch. Blend all ingredients until they are completely pureed. Pour salsa in a medium saucepan, and bring to a low boil.
3. Pour oil in a frying pan, and allow to get very hot. Slightly fry tortillas one by one in hot oil, setting each on a paper towel afterwards to soak some of the oil. Finally, dip slightly fried tortillas in low-boiling green salsa, until tortillas become soft again. Place on plates, 3 per person.
4. Fill or top tortillas with shredded chicken, then extra green sauce. Top with crumbled cheese, chopped onion, and chopped cilantro.
Es muy delicioso.
Serva con una ensalada verde y una buena cerveza.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higgs Boson wrote: ...

spread out newspapers in a place where they won't be disturbed (out of the direct sun and in a place that doesn't get hot or frozen).
place the green tomatoes on the newspapers with some space in between each fruit (so they don't touch).
eventually some of them will turn red. some will rot. that's just how it goes.
we did this last season with quite a few tomatoes that did not finish on the vine, but they came along eventually and we still ate or canned them.
yes, the flavor is not as good as vine ripened, but it is still acceptable and worth it instead of paying for tomatoes.
the way the weather is going this season we might have a garage full of them...
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This has been my experience, some turn red eventually a few get mushy and rot... I've been putting them in a paper bag with a ripe tomato, but it doesn't seem to really speed ripening up much. My dad used to pick a bunch of green tomatoes in the fall before frost, and he would have 2-3 dozen green ones in the basement which did not get much light. Most of them turned red over a few weeks. I don't remember many bad ones; he just laid them out without putting them in bags.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The ones that don't rot immediately were ones without bumps, bruises and systemic infections.
Back when the USDA's tomato germplasm collection was held at the Ames PI station, they would grow out some for increase every year. Most of the seed went back into the germplasm collection, but they'd gather up a bunch of "perfect" tomatoes from the plants and put them in a shed with long benches full of damp sand, and let them rot. (yes, it stunk! such is the price of science! <g>) They'd note which ones rotted first, second, last... and the lasts often went into the search for a long lived storage tomato.
Kay

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, August 14, 2013 2:42:03 PM UTC-7, Kay Lancaster wrote:

TIA
HB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mid to late 80s -- I'd have to check my transcripts to see when I took Seed Production. I wish I'd known about it when taking microbial ecology -- that sand would be fun to analyze.
It's probably all recorded in the PI records for those accessions, but I don't know that it's available online. Or you can try old reports of the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station.
Kay
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Our Quisling chemist(?), Ka-Boom, didn't mention that ripening bananas give off ethelene gas, but then he doesn't know if benzene is a liquid or not.

Again, if the tomatoes are starting to yellow, you have a chance of ripening them.
I'd still recommend the enchiladas.
By 2040, "white' will b a minority in the United States, and Frank and his bigoted friends will face the wrath of the majority.
<http://www.gallup.com/poll/160373/democrats-racially-diverse-republicans -mostly-white.aspx> Democrats Racially Diverse; "Tea Baggers" Mostly White
Extinction isn't just for Dinosaurs anymore, join the entitled, no-choice "White Whiners Party" on their Lemmings Run for Greed.
Tea, the new Kool Aid, isn't just for little girls with imaginary friends.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higgs Boson wrote:

Most green tomatoes will ripen, (if they are far enough along they have "jelly" in them) but the flavor will not be great -- still better than most supermarket tomatoes, and OK for cooking.
What happens if you let them vine-ripen? Or are the vines dead?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Aug 2013 11:47:37 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Lot's of recipes for fried green tomatoes... and pickled tomatoes are heavenly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.