pear pollen availability

I have a Comice pear tree that, after seven years, finally is producing some flowers. I've found conflicting evidence regarding its fertility. Most sources say that Comice is not self-fruitful, but one (http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu/general-pollination.html ) says it is self-fruitful in California (but not in the Pacific northwest.) I'd like to find a small amount of pear pollen to apply myself. Does anyone know where this might be available in southern California?
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Why not get a pollinator and let it reside in the back. I purchased a male holly and the berries have been about. Slow to see the effect but one holly without seed is a small price to pay for many with.
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Bill wrote:

I've thought of that, and I might still, but I figure the pollen might be a little cheaper, and it might also be a little late. I tried that with a couple of apple trees - one to bear, the other to pollinate - and it turned out they don't flower at the same time.
It's not a bad idea, though, and I may drive over to a very nice nursery nearby (Persson's, Pasadena) at lunch today and see what they have.
I'm still interested in the pollen availability, just as a matter of curiosity. I found one source up in Washington state that sells it for $1.40 per gram, but there's a 10 gram minimum and the shipping cost was about $20, so it would cost me $34 or so for an experiment that might not even work; the pears would be awfully expensive even if it did!

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