overwintering grasses

I keep thinking I want to get some red grass, but it is not hardy in my area (zone 5). Has anyone ever tried overwintering such things in the garage?
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Jean B.

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If you are referring to purple (or red) fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum 'Rubrum'), it can be overwintered in an area with bright but indirect light and temps that remain cool but above freezing. A lightly heated greenhouse would be best. It will be slow to emerge in spring and will need protection from late frosts. Not always a smooth or easy experiment - might be better to treat as an annual and replace with a well developed new specimen each year. Seeds of this form are sterile, so propagation must be done from division of an existing plant. Giant purple millet grows rather easily from seed and is available at a number of seed sources.
You could try Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica 'Red Baron'), which emerges in spring with bright red new growth that intensifies through summer, but may be marginal for your zone. Or Miscanthus 'Purpurescens', M. sinensis 'Mt. Washington' or Panicum virgatum 'Shenandoah' - all of which offer excellent fall shades of burgundy, red or purple but are more or less green during the summer months.
pam - gardengal
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Pam - gardengal wrote:

Thanks, Pam. I guess I can always experiment too. After all, if I do buy some, it will either die outside or possibly survive inside. I won't have lost anything if it dies inside.
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