New house with hard pack soil

Page 2 of 2  


sounds like a slow way to lower grade :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

lot
most
fall,
get
Ah yes...the wonder of new houses. Builders ought to be put in pillories in a public square and pelted with rotten vegetables, because of what they do to the soil. Any chance you can get your builder to bring back the topsoil he stole from you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't blame the builders. It is the government regulations that require soil compaction. It is mandated that the builder compact the soil. The building inspector must sign off on proper compaction before the foundation can be started. Blame your elected officials.
Dick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, but that doesn't mean they have to remove the topsoil for a hundred feet around the house, which is often the case.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aeration is a first step. But you need to take stronger measures if you have Subdivision Soil Syndrome. This happens when the developers scrape off all the topsoil and sell it, leaving the house sitting on often very nasty clay subsoil. Then they drive their heavy machinery around on it in wet weather just for good measure to make sure it is properly compacted.
Dig a hole. Do you see any earthworms? If not, you soil is never going to get any better than it is now. You can encourage earthworms by adding organic matter to the soil. Topdressing the lawn a couple time a year with 1/2" of compost is a start. Aerate first, then topdress for maximum effect.
Improving a truly lousy soil is a long, uphill battle, especially if you are trying to do it over an established lawn.
For more ways you can test your soil, including testing drainage, go to Plantfacts: http://plantfacts.osu.edu/web/ and search for -- soil testing drainage compaction -- and whatever else you're interested in.
Also, check with your local Extension office and see if they have a Horticulture Educator or turfgrass specialist. Extensions can be a good source of free advice that will address problems specific to your growing area.
Cheers!
-- Karen
The Garden Gate http://garden-gate.prairienet.org =================================================================="If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." ^and cats -- Cicero ==================================================================On the Web since 1994 Forbes Best of Web 2002
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you believe this, I'd like to marry you. :-) You'll have to put up with a certain amount of fishing, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL! I can see the headlines now: "Signature line prompts Internet marriage proposal".
Fishing as such would not present a problem, provided only the edible parts of any resulting fish are permitted to enter the house.
-- Karen
The Garden Gate http://garden-gate.prairienet.org =================================================================="If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." ^and cats -- Cicero ==================================================================On the Web since 1994 Forbes Best of Web 2002
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You've gotten some good responses but I'd like to add one other thing. I hope you are not catching the grass clippings but are allowing the clippings to remain on the lawn to act as a mulch. Soil such as you describe and what I too have, needs all the organic material it can get. This is no over night solution and probably won't solve your problem any time soon. However from experience, I can tell you it does eventually help.

lot
most
fall,
get
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.