Need holly help please( zone 9)

Borderline zone 9-10.
Had a week of freezing nights here in January.
Holly bush now has very sparse, curled leaves. What if anything can I do to bring it back to its old green self?
It has never had berries, to my knowledge. Former owner planted it but I have no idea when. It was growing very sloooooooooooooowly, by the way.
Thanks.
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"Kalmia" wrote

I think you are too hot for Holly. You have some other issue, not the cold. Mine was happy with 2ft of snow on it.
Not sure of the answer, but this seems more some sort of disease to me?
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Temp could be a issue as pointed out. Some Hollies at the URL go to Zone 9. NJ has all sort of holly available. Years ago some wild ones were taken and propagated "Old Heavy Berry" comes to mind. I've go some Japanese and Chinese about to add to your options and don't forget to plant a male as it pollinates and will grant you more berries.
<http://www.hollyhillnurseries.com/9203/41327.html ?*session*id*key*=*sess ion*id*val*>
--
Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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With many plants like rhodies the colder the more leaf curl... I can guestimate temps pretty accurately by their leaf curl. My hollies would bask in -20. My spruce looks sad unless winter is -40. With many evergreens in the colder climes the colder the better. I would also say zone 9-10 is much too warm for holly.
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On 4/16/10 9:45 AM, Kalmia wrote:

There are many varieties of holly. My favorite gardening book lists 19 different species and hybrids. Just within Ilex cornuta (Chinese holly), it lists 7 varieties. Some are much more winter-hardy than others. Some are more tolerant of hot summers than others. Take a branch to a good nursery (not a lumber yard or hardware store) to have it identified.
I have several I. cornuta 'Burfordii Nana' (dwarf Burford holly), both in front and in back. They grow vigorously and always produce abundant berries. Our winters are relatively mild, never getting colder than the upper 20s. Our summers can be torrid, with temperatures sometimes reaching 110F. On the other hand, my summers are far too hot for I. aquifolium (English holly), which is hardy down to about 10F.
Hollies are similar to asparagus, Ginkgo biloba, and ash trees in that there are male plants and female plants. All varieties of I. cornuta that have berries do so without cross pollination. Most other species of holly require cross pollination from a male plant for a female to produce berries.
Hollies require acid soil that drains well. They are susceptible to scale and leaf miners, both of which can cause severe damage. They respond well to heavy pruning, which is best done in the early winter.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Update: it's coming back. Leaves are green and new leaves are sprouting. Yay.
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