Need help identifying these plants

Can anyone identify these plants?
http://www.geocities.com/mcqualude/plants/plant.html
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McQualude

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Plant A: Need a close-up photo to ID. Plant B: Yes, it is a Privet and considered a weed/invasive plant. Plant C: Chinese Privet but not considered weedy. Plant D: Chinese Privet will often grow on soil surface. Plant E: Abelia which is considered a good, trouble-free, long-blooming shrub. Plant F: Japanese Aucuba which needs full or part-shade.
There is an old, proven rule regarding the existing landscape of newly bought property. Wait and view the plants for one year before removing any live plants. What looks bad now may look like a star later.
Can anyone identify these plants?
http://www.geocities.com/mcqualude/plants/plant.html
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McQualude



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I posted a higher res picture, if it isn't clear enough I will take a better picture today.

It is ironic then that B is considered invasive, yet C is the one that is spreading. My wife dug them up once or twice and they keep coming back. I would like more of B, it grows very quickly and makes a good privacy screen.

Too bad it's ugly, or at least mine is. There are two other plants that keep trying to use the Abelia as a host. I have cut them out but they are persistant. The Abelia sits next to an unidentified Holly which makes it look worse. The Holly is evergreen, shiny, shapes well and looks somewhat regal. The Abelia is a chaotic looking bush that looks even worse when it drops it's leaves in the fall, just ugly.
Any advice about getting rid of the parasitic plants or helping the Abelia is welcome. The pictures I saw on the web look much different than the scraggly beast I have.

Thanks.
We've actually been here 4 years, but most of that time I was working 70-80 hrs week and I didn't know or care we had plants. I finally got sick of working more and earning less and quit, after a while I started noticing these plants we have, LOL.

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McQualude

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Plant A: I checked the new close-up but these old eyes cannot pick up the details of the leaves and how they are attached. Sorry. Are those white flowers on it? What is your climate, North, Southeast, Northeast, Midwest?
Plants B, C and D: Yes, it is ironic. Plant B produces lots of seeds which the birds love and spread undigested everywhere. Lots of problems in forests since Privet is an exceptionally strong grower with roots to hell and back. In this Mid-South area privet pulls are held in nature areas to prevent privet from taking over and killing the native plants. Sale of common privet is outlawed in some regions. The Chinese Privet is apparently sterile. If you want to look up pictures, Plant B is probably Ligustrum amurense (Amur Privet) and Plant C and D is Ligustrum sinense (Chinese Privet).
Plant E is not great for foundation planting; most people would want something evergreen. There is no work-free way to get weed growth out of the center of a shrub. Fall or spring you could cut back the Abelia to about 6 inches and then chop out the weed part. I have a problem here with Bermuda Grass growing in ground cover Junipers. I use a piece of cardboard or several sheets of newspaper temporarily on top of the Juniper next to the grass. Then I bend the grass over on the cardboard and spray the grass with weed killer. Perhaps you could adapt this to your problem.
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McQualude



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wrote in message>> Plant B: Yes, it is a Privet and considered a weed/invasive plant.

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Plant A, the white one seems to be an arrow hedge lol. Actually, I think plant B may be a myoporum, according to what you describe, but I would have to see better. Hard to tell from the pics. http://www.cuyamaca.net/oh170/Thumbnail_Pages/Myoporum_laetum.asp may help
Plant C D and E are very familiar, but I can't think of the names right now. I'll be at a nursery this week and will spot it, I'm sure. The one you like (f) looks like a Gold Dust plant http://plantsdatabase.com/go/130/
Be sure to check http://plants.usda.gov/gallery.html for more help.

GC Certified Square Foot Gardening Instructor http://www.squarefootslo.com Learn to be a freelance web designer http://www.howtofreelance.com
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comREMOVE (Square Foot Gardening) said:

I tried looking up 'arrow hedge' but didn't find anything

My pictures aren't the greatest, I should have took them at higher resolution. The plant does resemble a myoporum in the picture, but not in real life. The stem structure is different.

Bingo!
Thanks, will do.

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