missing garden friends.........


Well apparently there are quite a few missing friends from our cyber backyard. Grdngal has lost her newsgroups capability, and now I've found that the other Marilyn up in Ohio has lost HER newsgroups thanks to AOL dropping them. This is horrible!! It's like walking down the street to visit a friend's garden and discovering in the night that the whole yard has been whisked away! I guess I'll have to personally e-mail some of my garden friends to see if they're having newsgroup withdrawal. I wonder why AOL would do this? (and the server that Pam, aka grdngal, has) madgardener up on the snowy ridge, where we FINALLY got snow (it's all gone Eastwards to North Carolina every time!) back in Faerie Holler, overlooking a beautiful wintery English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7?, Sunset zone 36
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They can use Google.com to read and post to Newsgroup, even if they are silly enough to stay with AOL.
I would guess AOL did this for at least a couple of reasons. -Newsgroup activity can use up a lot of bandwidth and AOL is slow enough the way it is, some readers download and upload a great deal of data. -AOL can not put spam pop-ups in your newsgroup, they want you back on their home page, clicking and buying it up, reading their advertisements.
Cheers, Jim
<DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Well apparently there are quite a few missing friends from our cyber backyard.&nbsp; Grdngal has lost her newsgroups capability, and now I've found that the other Marilyn up in Ohio has lost HER newsgroups thanks to AOL dropping them.&nbsp; This is horrible!!&nbsp; It's like walking down the street to visit a friend's garden and discovering in the night that the whole yard has been whisked away!&nbsp; I guess I'll have to personally e-mail some of my garden friends to see if they're having newsgroup withdrawal. I wonder why AOL would do this? (and the server that Pam, aka grdngal, has)</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>madgardener up on the snowy ridge, where we FINALLY got snow (it's all gone Eastwards to North Carolina every time!) back in Faerie Holler, overlooking a beautiful wintery English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7?, Sunset zone 36</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
------=
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Play4abuck wrote:

So few ISP customers even know what newsgroups are that bandwidth is not an issue. In the case of AOL, a proprietary interface was used (you couldn't use a real newsreader), and it was crappy enough for text messages. I seriously doubt that they had a problem with people downloading or uploading huge quanities of binaries.

It's been a while since you've been on AOL, hasn't it. Or do you not have any personal experience, and are just perpetuating misconceptions held dear by so many others who also really don't have any personal experience?
Quite simplely the issue is that not enough people used newsgroups on AOL to make it worth the expense. AOL may be one of the first to completely dump Usenet because they had the additional costs associated with their proprietary interface (or a choice of revamping the service to allow real nntp traffic.)
Other ISP's are finding their costs too high even without an interface to maintain. The first step, which is already pretty common, is outsourcing their Usenet servers. Next will come limiting monthly transfers to contain the costs of providing wholesale accounts to customers. Eventually Usenet will be dropped completely. For many ISP's, even if they lost every single customer to whom Usenet service is important, they'd still come out ahead. And once their compeditors stop offering unlimited Usenet, the likelyhood of losing any customers goes down.
The bottom line is if every ISP dropped Usenet service tomorrow, it might make the headlines at some techie websites, and it might be worth a column inch or two on an inside page of the local paper's business section, but it wouldn't even get a passing mention on the nightly news. We Usenet users are a very small faction in today's gentified Internet community.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wow, thanks for educating me Warren. to think of the gardeners as a small fraction of users humbles me (I am most sincere in this statement) and what on earth will we do if we can't visit each other at rec.gardens?? I've made life friends here on the newsgroup over these last seven years, and hope to touch more gardeners out there with my foolish but passionate rambles and what not postings. I'm not selfish, I just appreciate what we have here. My alternative is gardenweb who is strictly monitored by Spike and I've been careful not to overstep my limits with him because I understand he can banish me from the whole thing to the Disney website. (something that smacks of freedom of speech to me, although I don't use offensive words most times, but there comes a limit to the "political correctness" that is tolerable. I posted one of my rambles on his newgroup forum but before I posted it, I had to remove my phrase of dawg eating shit from a picket fence because I knew I'd be slapped for saying the phrase no matter the appropriate description. I wonder how close sometimes we're getting to the world portrayed in the sci fi where people were fined for language use (Stallone and Bullock and Snipes) and other improper offences. (I think of the "President Swartzenegger library and have to laugh, because who would have thought of even the possibility of Gov. Swartz. back then? LOL)
But again, thanks for the insightful reasonings. I'll watch closer and appreciate what I have here more. madgardener

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
madgardener wrote:

Usenet users are who I was referring to as being a small faction.
There are plenty of gardeners, of varying degrees of commitment. Someone is taking care of all those beds and lawns out there. But Usenet users are a rare breed.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I realize that my message here is doing little more than taking up space, but I must add that I am also greatly appreciative that this group has hung together so well for so long. My interest here follows the seasons, I generally drop out near the end of the summer and resubscribe in January, when the gardening itch demands scratching. I've participated in numerous groups, both Usenet and Listservs, over the years, and I'm so happy that this group has not been overtaken by spammers or control freaks. Thanks guys. -- Mr Gardener -- Zone 5 - On The Maine Coast
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"madgardener" wrote:

Outlook Express is an offline newsreader. The basic definition of an offline newsreader means it downloads the newsgroup to your hard disk and stores it in a file for reading later on. OE does this when you click on the Synchronize Newsgroup menu item.
For security, make sure Outlook Express is set to view files in Plain Text (Tools, Options, Read tab). And never open any attached documents by double-clicking on them (except maybe .jpg or .gif and ONLY if Internet Explorer is NOT set up as the default program to view such files).
-- Jim Carlock Please post replies to newsgroup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Carlock wrote:

There are two ways to use an "offline" newsreader. 1. Download every message in a group, so that the messages are available to read offline, or 2. First download all the headers, go offline, mark those you want to read, go back online, retrieve those messages, and then go offline again.
In the first example, no tracking is possible because you've downloaded everything. No one can guess which messages you read, and which you didn't. In the second example, tracking is as possible as reading the messages online. The difference is in offline reading, you do not stay connected to the ISP while you're reading.
If you have dial-up, and only one phone line, then the advantage of the second example is that your phone line is only tied-up while you're actually downloading the messages, and not while you're reading them. If you're paying by the minute for your dial-up connection, the advantage is obvious. If you're doing the first method, and downloading everything before going offline, the benefit is less, unless you were going to read every message anyway.
If you're not paying by the minute, or if you have a dedicated connection (either a phone line just for the modem, or you're on cable, DSL or other "always-on" type system), there simply is no benefit to using a newsreader in offline mode.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Warren" wrote:

Hi Warren,
Not sure what you mean by no tracking is possible. As I was specifically talking about Outlook Express, and I don't see anyone as being able to "track" which messages YOU read unless you reply to them. That statement just doesn't make any sense to me...
Almost all newsreaders provide a mechanism for highlighting message threads (called "watching" the thread). Also, unread messages are usually flagged or boldened in some manner. A thread with an unread message gets enboldened as well, making it very easy to tell if there's an unread message in any thread.
When you first download the messages in OE, unread ones are highlighted (boldened)... it's very easy to tell which you have read and which you haven't. Furthermore, there are two other mechanisms in Outlook Express... 1) Flag, you can flag any message, I only find this useful in rare cases, and 2) you can watch messages. Watched messages show up as a red highlight. And if it's an unread watched message, the newsgroup is shows up as bold red.
Microsoft put a convenient feature inside of Outlook Express as well. OE will download the "watched" messages (red) first. And then it'll finish downloading the headers and then move on to the next newsgroup. ;-)
Just remember, watched is red, whether it's read or not, whether or not you actively watch it. Ctrl+A, Ctrl+Q turns off all bold entries and marks everything as read, whether it's red or unread or BOTH!
Being that you are using Outlook Express, I'm a little puzzled by what you mean by tracking.
;-) Enjoy! It was fun writing about watched messages and Ctrl+Q.
Oh, by the way, you usually can tell if the thread interests you, by reading the first item in the thread. If it doesn't interest you, Ctrl+Q on that first item marks the whole thread as read and you can then do a Ctrl+U to jump to the next unread message.
-- Jim Carlock Please post replies to newsgroup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hm, threads sometimes start dull but become interesting later. On my offline newsreader, I can click open a thread's header to show a list of participants, before opening any messages. Often the authors list is a far more reliable indicator of the thread's interest-level for myself, than its header.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You listen to Janet. She's the resident troll here.
She can turn even the most innocent posting into a hateful flame war!!!!!
contains these words:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 13:30:36 GMT, "Cereus-validus....."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The same is true of method 1. Doing that, I download 8 groups in just over a minute. The phoneline is only tied up for that minute. Offline, I can then decide for myself what I want to read.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ISPs know that only a tiny fraction of their customers use, or even know about, usenet, yet it ties up a lot of their time and equipment. They can improve their earnings by dropping usenet, as only a few customers will leave when they do that. Some ISPs just eliminate the equipment for usenet, and buy feed from one of the usenet services, at a discount. Mine does that and we never knew it when they made the switch, but now when I ask them to add a newsgroup, they say they can't, as it is out of their control.
Google can be used, or if you want the best service, you can sign up with one of the usenet providers; I think most cost about $10 a month.
madgardener wrote:

--
SPAMBLOCK NOTICE! To reply to me, delete the h from apkh.net, if it is
there.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
madgardener Wrote:

Hi Madgardener,
Your cyber friends can reach these posts at a free forum where I acces it. It's the General Gardening catagory. http://tinyurl.com/57ofx
New
-- Newt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My goodness, Newt, you have the best links! Thanx for posting that one!
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ann Wrote:

Hi Ann,
You gave me a giggle. :) You should see how 'stuffed' my bookmark are!
New
-- Newt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.