Maple reverted to root stock

I planted a threadleaf maple tree years (decades!) ago. At a certain point, I noticed it was starting to revert to root stock (which is not threadleaf). I never did anything about it and it's way too late now.
So, just to educate myself, WAS there in fact any way to reverse that root stock takeover, if caught early enough?
If so, how?
TIA
Persephone
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On 1/26/2010 2:09 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

First, you have to identify where the graft is. It may be a slight change in the thickness -- a swelling or thinning -- of the trunk or a strange bend in the trunk.
Then, if you see any shoots (suckers) from below that point remove them. This includes any suckers from the roots and not just suckers from the base of the trunk. Instead of cutting them away (which might result in even more shoots from the stub), try to pull or break the suckers away.
This should also be done for other grafted and budded woody plants, especially roses. Only roses that are "own root" -- grown from rooted cuttings -- are exempt. Peaches, dwarf and semi-dwarf citrus (and possibly non-dwarf citrus), and grapes are others that require attention to removing suckers.
Also note that some woody plants send up suckers from their roots even if they have not been grafted or budded. This is true of poplars (aspen, cottonwood, etc), crepe myrtle, Brazilian pepper, and (to a small extent) liquidambar. You can get quite a thicket from some of these if suckers are not controlled.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Thank you, David. Very interesting. I wish I had researched the matter long ago instead of just letting it go. The thread-leaf look is (was!) so beautiful.
Persephone
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On Tue, 26 Jan 2010 14:09:10 -0800 (PST), Higgs Boson

I would not think this is much different than a grafted rose. Remove any new growth below the graft. Of course, it is better to check this once or twice a year. If your grafted part is still alive, you got a chance.
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