laying turf on a stony slope

Hi
I'm new to this forum and need some help please! We have recently rotivated an overgrown slope at the end of our garden and want to lay turf with the idea that it will keep the weeds at bay. However, it has lots of stones and chalk. We are raking off the surface stones but when we dig over there are lots more stones and chalk below the surface. Will it be alright to lay turf on such stony ground? We won't be walking on it as its a fairly steep slope.
Thanks everyone!
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Jane 22


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On 7/1/2016 1:33 PM, Jane 22 wrote:

If you want grass, you will want an ornamental grass that does not require mowing. Mowing will be a severe problem on a slope. You might try red fescue (Festuca rubra). This grows about 1-2 feet tall and flops over, creating a turf about 6 inches thick.
However, a slope might be subject to erosion. Grasses generally do not root deeply enough to hold a steep slope in place. I would suggest English ivy (Hedera helix). If the area is not very large, the dwarf variety (H. helix 'Hahn's') can be used; it is far less invasive than the regular variety.
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David E. Ross
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Jane 22 wrote:

an overgrown slope and you tilled it? eek! gonna be a mess...
yes, you could put turf over that and eventually it will either die off or degrade and the overgrown state will return. everytime you mow it or do something to it the slope is disturbed and new rocks will appear.
i would instead recommend a mix of species which are adapted to growing on thin and poor soil, small grasses, wildflowers (annual and perennial poppies, pinks, basically anything you can find that will grow in from seed, species tulips, crocus, love in a mist, creeping phlox, etc.) it won't be uniform, it won't look neat, but it will function as an ecosystem and have diversity, some flowers here or there to support wild bees and butterflies. as you go through time you will find certain plants that go very well there. it will be much more interesting than yet another hillside of turf.
if you enjoy meditive arts you could start making small terraces using the rocks which appear to hold any topsoil that exists and that would encourage certain plants more to hold the soil in place (and any moisture :) ). using the larger rocks as stepping stones/stairs to get here or there without disturbing the surface.
songbird
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wrote:

A steep slope will be difficult/dangerous to mow. I agree with the terracing... depending on the features of a rocky slope it may also be suitable for a water feature. Without more detail (area size, grade angle, sun/shade, etc.) it's difficult to offer meaningful advice, photos would help.
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On 7/1/2016 3:33 PM, Jane 22 wrote:

I live in a very hilly neighborhood. Take it from me, you don't want to plant something on a steep or tall bank that will require regular maintenance. Grass is not a good choice, since it requires regular mowing, and on steep slopes that it tiring and often hazardous.
I've just completed a two-year project of planting my back slope with low-growing shrubbery. I'm currently using a string trimmer on the grass between the shrubs; my hope is that by next year the shrubs will have filled out and suckered to the point where there will no longer be grass between them.
My advice to you would be to consult with an expert in your area to obtain recommendations as to ground covers or shrubs suitable for planting on embankments.
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