Kale question

I've never grown kale before, but over the past 5 years I've found that I like it more than any variety of lettuce for salads, and I buy it more and more frequently. I've got a couple of questions for those who have grown it before.
I figured that I might as well try to grow it. I'm here in southern Ohio, inside a large city's limits where the temp averages about 5 degrees warmer than out in the country 10 miles out.
I bought kale seeds this summer, and soaked them to get them growing quicker. I put them in a raised bed, planting them about August 15. They sprouted marvelously, and I just thinned them. Most of the plants now have their first true leaf.
Question is, did I plant them too late?
We usually have a first frost by the very last day of October, or first week of November. I'm not sure if I left enough time for the plants to grow. Of course, we could have a whole month left of weather getting into the 80's most every day, and they do get a lot of full sun now that I cut down the cherry tree nearby.
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OhioGuy wrote:

Kale and other cabbage crops are tough and can stand pretty cold weather. Brussels sprouts and kale become sweeter after a frost.
gloria p
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    No. If they can withstand the high temps of late summer and early autumn, you should do pretty well. Frost improves the flavor of brassica (kale, collards, cabbage, etc.) and many, including kale, can withstand overnight freezing temps, depending on daytime temps. You can extend your harvest period by "cropping" developed leaves and not pulling the entire plant and covering the plants with straw or tenting them for cold overnights.
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OhioGuy wrote:

I grow several Kale cultivars and they are very tough. They last over a year (they are biennials) and survive over 110F in summer and down to 27F with several hard frosts in winter. It may survive lower tempertures - I don't know.
Cut the outside leaves regularly and they will keep producing for their lifetime. They are also more resistant to pests such as cabbage moth than most brassicas. For a tough, nutritious leafy green that is easy to grow you cannot go past Kale.
David
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As other have said, they're tough. I'm in Rochester NY. In late September, I cover the plants with fallen leaves to about 3/4 of their height, and put wire fence on either side of the row to keep the leaves from blowing away. This seems to be just enough cover to keep the plants from freezing to death later. I've harvested kale anywhere from late November to early January, depending on how evil a winter we're having. The plants don't seem to grow much, but they don't die either. Because of the minimal growth, you might want to plant twice as much to compensate.
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much, but they don't die either. Because of the minimal growth, you might

Curious - I wonder if I could set up some sort of "wall 'o water" style thing to really get them to live through a lot of the winter?
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wrote:

Look at various cold frame designs. Here is just one. The window well covers looked interesting.
<http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/main/pdf/coldfram.pdf
Bill
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