I saw the coolest plant!

This morning, I saw the coolest plant, Arisaema sikokianum! It is a Japanese/Chinese (depending on what you read) Jack-in-the-Pulpit. The pitcher is practically black on the outside, while the interior spadix is pure white. It is just striking. I am about to go back and buy one (all I can afford) now that I have done some research and ascertained they will survive in zone 5.
This site gives you some idea of how beautiful this plant is:
http://www.plantdelights.com/Catalog/Current/Detail/01850.html
For those of you near Cambridge, Massachusetts, they are at Pemberton Gardens in the shade section. Just don't buy them all ere I get there.
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Jean B.

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how much are they selling for?
chaz
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chaz wrote:

VERY expensive: $35. Sounds like there's a good possibility one could propagate some from the seeds.
--
Jean B.

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Arisaemas are one of my favorite plant types - I grow about 15 different species, including sikokianum and tortuosum, which will grow to the impressive size of nearly 6 feet. All have interesting features - either highly colored or contrasting spathes and spadix, mottling on the stems and/or foliage and often a long, tail-like porojection from the hood of the spathe that can extend for several feet. Most are hardy to zone 7 but a few will tolerate zone 6 and some even zone 5. A rather exotic and appealing addition to a shade garden with rich, humusy and moist soil.
They do propagate well from seed - I have a number of seedlings popping up this year - but the sexual orientation of the genus is confused at best and it may take some years before a plant will set viable seed. Both Heronswood and Naylor Creek offer an impressive array of arisaemas for sale by mail order. Prices range from $10 to $20.
pam - gardengal
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There's also the Italian Arum.
Alan
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snipped-for-privacy@junk.min.net wrote:

I'll look that up!
--
Jean B.

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Look for Arum italicum - cultivar most often available is Arum italicum 'Pictum' or synonymously, 'Marmoratum' and is commonly called Lords and Ladies. This cultivar has great patterning on the pointed foliage in white. Not an uncommon plant and should be readily availble at good quality nurseries in your area for a modest price. While both are members of the Araceae family, arums and arisaemas are quite distinct in appearance - arums bear a very strong resemblance to callas, to which they are very closely related.
Be careful how you site Arum italicum - it will self seed readily and can be borderline invasive.
pam - gardengal
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Pam - gardengal wrote:

Thanks again, Pam. I'll look it up and then look for it too. Thanks also for the caution.
--
Jean B.

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here in warm sf bay area, a i is a good oldfashioned survivor plant. doens't spread unless someone actively digs them up and tosses the dirt around. i think a few seedlings may survive, if the ground is sell prepped. otherwise easily sprouted in container mix.
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Pam - gardengal wrote:

Thanks, Pam. In the course of looking this one up, I saw some very intriguing pics. I never knew there were so many absolutely intriguing Arisaemas! Have you ever tried growing them in large pots? I may move sometime, and it would be nice to take them with me if I did. I gather they don't like to have their roots disturbed.
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the
few
up
and
Heronswood
I've never tried to move one (that's got to be a first in my garden!!), so I have no idea how well they will respond to such an activity. I do know that many of the more tender of the species can be dug and stored overwinter, so it can't be all that radical a treatment. I have grown them in containers for a limited time - it is not much to their liking - but I have one that requires the corm/tuber to mature for three years before top growth emerges and I didn't want to risk it being lost in the jungle of my garden. It did leaf out and flower this spring, so into the garden it goes.
This link goes into some good detail regarding their container growth and seed starting. http://www.head-crash.com/~rrh/Pages/arculture.html
They become oddly addicting plants to grow.
pam - gardengal
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Pam - gardengal wrote:

Great! Homework! I have to think about where these guys can go safely. There is a perfect place for them, but the neighbor won't leep his tools off of our property, so that is out. I think I may put them under a dogwood where it is not as wet as much of the back yard is.
I can quite see how these may be addictive. They ate just so interesting.
--
Jean B.

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Its stunning! Would you please keep us updated as to how well it does for you?
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eclectic wrote:

Sure! I am so excited! If there are any left next week, I may get it a companion. Boy, in looking for nice pics of this one, I saw all sorts of other really nifty-looking ones.
--
Jean B.

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