Hydrangas Won't Flower

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It's clickable here in Agent 2.0, which is set for plain text. However, it does recognize the www as a URL.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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expounded:

Just as I thought. Everything's fine. Travis was just having a PMS day.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Actually, the fact that most people saw a clickable link in your plain text message shows that Travis was right. There was no point in sending an HTML message just because a url was being included. Most clients will make a url clickable even in a plain text message. A pageful of HTML mark-up was unnecessary.
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Warren H.

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Warren wrote:

Thank you.
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Travis in Shoreline Washington

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They need sun to bloom. A northern exposure will have less flowers.
Too much nitrogen fertilizer will prevent them from blooming but make them grow tall and green. You might test your soil and see if you need potassium or potash.
Most hygrangeas bloom on old wood, so pruning them will keep them from blooming. This is especially true of the mopheads. Endless Summer is an exception that blooms on old wood and new wood.
Some hydrangeas are not cold hardy and cold winters will kill the buds. Florist hydrangeas frequently fall into this category.
Also, late spring freezes will kill buds. When this happens, the plant usually loods bad.
It would help to know what varieties you have and where you are located.
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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
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I'm pretty sure I have the Mophead variety. I'm in St. Louis, MO. I pruned the old wood in the spring, and most of it was dead. Testing my soil sounds like a good idea.

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This is your problem. The old wood is not dead. It is where all your flower buds are located. You won't get any flowers. You can't prune the old wood and expect flowers.
Hydrangeas do not need to be pruned. However, if you insist:
For mophead and oak leaf hydrangeas you need wait until the new foliage comes out in the spring. Then only dead wood should be removed. After the plants are at least 4 years old, about 1/3 of the older stems can be removed down to the ground each summer. This will revitalize the plant. In addition, if it becomes necessary to prune a plant to reduce its size, it may be cut back in June or July without harming the next year's bloom.
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