How remove dead grass.

About 2 weeks ago I sucked up my principles and applied R*****d Up to a 6 x 15 DG (decomposed granite) area that had become grass/weedy. The growth o bediently died. Now I don't know now to get rid of it so I can lay down mo re DG. Should I scrape with a flat blade shovel, or is there an easier wa y, or...?
TIA
HB
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On 4/7/2014 12:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Flame it?
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Higgs Boson wrote:

what is the area used for?
songbird
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On Monday, April 7, 2014 1:39:09 PM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

Nothing. It's just a space between two planting beds, which have borders separating them from the DG space.
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

...

so you want to add more of a material which isn't doing the job to a place that serves no purpose?
if you want something which does the job better use a weed barrier or landscape fabric and then put a larger sized rock on top of that deeply enough that it won't sprout as many grass seeds.
songbird
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On Monday, April 7, 2014 3:48:37 PM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

Ouch! True, bu painful Have struggled with that area over time.

input on how to get rid of existing dead grass (preferably with minimum energy output <g>)
Sidebar: This grass sprouted in area where not usual; we actually had a decent RAIN a few weeks ago. It's April now; little hope of more; "season" usually ended in March, but all bets are off now; State is in full drought panic mode.
Wish they would consult with Israel; world leader in water conservation and RO (reverse osmosis) = getting water from the sea. Faut de mieux, they're always exploring other options.
Joke: Israelis complaining that "God", after those "40 years" wandering in the desert landed them in a place with no oil and no water.
HB
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On 4/7/2014 11:02 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Sounds like you want to keep the ground firm and stable for applying the decomposed granite without worrying about it settling unevenly, so tilling or digging is out. I'd just use a mower or a weed whip to trim it as short as possible. That would probably be sufficient. If you really want to get rid of it, do a small, careful burn of the area after trimming it as short as you can get it.
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On Wednesday, April 9, 2014 10:48:04 AM UTC-7, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Thanks, Moe. Grass is now dead thanks to R*****up. I just want to get rid of the dead grass.
Am actually thinking of removing the whole DG shebang and paving the area with used brick, which I have some of. But job of excavating to the depth of the brick is not for tomorrow...not highest priority.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

How tall was the growth? If fairly short, say less than 8" within about 10 days it will mostly decay and shouldn't take more than an hour to yank most out by hand (wear gloves). Or obtain one or those propane weeding torches and burn it out effortlessly in less than twenty minutes... with the torch you didn't need the R*****d Up. http://tinyurl.com/ksr5xa2 (Amazon.com product link shortened)347507633924356830&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_1gfl6y1ez0_b
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Higgs Boson wrote:

If you're going to lay pavers do NOT remove the DG, it makes an excellent base, simply lay about 3"-4" of finely crushed stone or builders sand over, level (screed) and tamp, then lay your pavers and sweep sand into the spaces. Be wary of the used brick directly on the ground, it doesn't hold up well to freezes on the ground, red brick absorbs moisture, many will split/crumble. You're better off using those used bricks otherwise. Pavers meant to be used on the ground are made with high density concrete so will hold up well on the ground
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On Wednesday, April 9, 2014 3:14:20 PM UTC-7, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Thanks for the heads-up about not removing the DG!!
Re: used brick, freeze not a factor (mild climate). Have had used brick paving in the "junque" area for years; no problem.
Thanks also for earlier post about just pulling up the dry grass. Curious -- did you say "wear gloves" because of possible chemical effect on hands from the R******Up?
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

It depends on how thick it is. If it is thick then when it eventually rots down your paving will sink to fill in the gaps. But this may not matter if you don't walk on the area.

The amount that would be left on the surface is very small because you applied a dilute solution (assuming you followed directions) and glyphosate degrades quickly in the environment. As it isn't that toxic to start with so the residue is probably insignificant. Overuse of glyphosate is more an issue with leading to resistance and so ineffectiveness than immediate toxicity. If a few drops of it was harmful, given the amount used each year, there would be an obvious epidemic of sick people in agriculture. But if it worries you by all means wear gloves.
D
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Higgs Boson wrote:

The recommendation to wear gloves has nothing to do with RoundUp. Anytime you're handling weeds protect your hands because many plants contain toxins, chemical irritants, and microscopic needle-like barbs... and even if you wash your hands they may remain and you can transfer these to other people too. When doing that kind of work you really should remove all your soiled clothing before entering the house, even hose yourself off outside. The last people who lived in my house farmed this land, the staircase entrance to the basement is in the garage, they had a commercial Sears washing machine and a shower in the basement..., they never came directly into the house from working in the fields... I still use that over sized machine for laundering comforters, cotton floor mats, and other large items.
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