Herb Gardening

Herbs are a wonderful class of plants that has made life better for mankind from the very beginning of history. To this day they are still serving as always. I discovered the joys of herb gardening a while back and I love to tell others about how they can also gain the same satisfaction that I have. So go out and plant some rosemary or basil today.
--
coykiesaol


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Why those two fairly pedestrian herbs?
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"FarmI" wrote:

Most culinary herbs are fairly pedestrian. However those two head my list of least favorites... rosemary reminds me of Pine Sol terlit bowl cleaner and basil is too medicinal, like licorice cough drops... I'd much rather bay leaf and fennel seed.
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On 2011-01-05, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Hmmm, doesn't take too much trouble to plant but you want to separate those that need more water and those that need less. Do a bit of research and find out which. Basil is a needed ingredient to me as well as mint, oregano, parsley, tarragon and even rosemary which doesn't take much if you like lamb. Gresh herbs are great!
--
Bud

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On Wed, 05 Jan 2011 23:47:26 +0000, Bud wrote:

I also grow cilantro, Italian broadleaf parsley, thyme and sage, but we use basil the most and my favorite is rosemary, not for cooking but as an ornamental. It is the only plant I have which reliably flowers all winter long every winter, and it smells good. Wintering rosemary here in zone 5 USA (Philadelphia area) so that they will bloom requires something resembling a greenhouse (I keep mine on an enclosed front porch with southern exposure and a heater to prevent freezing). They can also be kept outside in a cold frame or in a well sheltered spot adjacent to a building with southern exposure, but they will not bloom outside during winter and harsh winters may kill them. Keeping them inside a heated house is not a viable option, they will die before spring, so if this is your only option then rosemary will be an annual for you, but if you can winter them over they will get quite large and can be pruned into a "standard" or other shape. I pruned one into a 4 foot tall Christmas tree shape, pre-decorated with flowers, add lights and a few ornaments, save a tree :-).
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I've had luck growing Rosemary outside in a wall of water. Down to just one out of four due to mole/voles . They don't grow too large but we like it with roasted potatoes.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"Always tell the truth and you don't have to remember anything."
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"Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message

Most are indeed, but not anglica, or lovage or tarragon.
I'm just wondering why rosmary and basil given that they are so common and any gardener with an interest in veg growing would grow them.
If the OP has found the 'joys of herb growing' then I'm curious as to why they name two common herbs. I wouldn't include in any joy category. Useful yes, but joy, no. Anglica is joyful and especially once it's glaced.
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Is that in a glass or on a cake?
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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I would call a joyful herb one you can smoke........LOL
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wrote:

Mullein, red clover and St. John's Wort (which I hope comes back) are 3 herbs that I find joyful. I've never grown angelica but it looks pretty and useful. Maybe I'll try it this year.

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St John's Wort is considered a noxious weed where I live and we're compelled by Council By Laws to remove it/poison it. I too love Mullein though but my husband hates it and will pull it out if I don't keep a close on him. I threaten him with murder if he so much as looks at it sideways.
What do you do with the red clover?
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wrote:

SJW a noxious weed - amazing. I rarely use it but love the color a tincture or olive oil will become when soaking the flowers - a very deep red.
Red clover - a tincture of the blossoms keeps me from having hot flashes and night sweats. I'm able to pick enough in the spring and early summer to last through the year. I am very dedicated to doing that. :)

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Some plants just grow like Topsy in Oz and what is a nice mild mannered garden plant in some other part of the world becomes a rampant, strangle you in your bed at night type thing. Some just stuff up pastures and do intestinal damage to grazing animals and so need to be eradicated.
I rarely use it but love the color a

It's a great dyeing plant for fibre (a hobby of mine) so I'm pretending I can't see the patch that I know about :-))

That rings bell. I'm sure I've seen alternative medicine from Europe (Germany perhaps) where that was the active ingredient.
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coykiesaol;909254 Wrote:

Hi, personally I would transplant it using a well draining potting mix, like 2 parts cactus soil and 2 parts perlite. I also would cut it back a little just above a leave node to encourage it to branch.
--
BobWalsh

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