help!!!

hi
i actually know very little about gardening but my mom and i are i need of some serious help.
We live in South Africa, which can be a harsh climate for plant especially in one bed by the swimming pool, there is no way we can ge anything to grow there because of the heat, do u have any suggestions?
i would also like to know wat sort of small plant would do well in ful shade all day(if there are any), preferably with flowers.
my mom loves gardening but she unfortunately cannot do much of i herself lately because her back is so bad, i would like to hel her(maybe give her a 'present' for christmas) by fixing our garedn up Please help it would be much appreciated
-- polywogle
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polywogle wrote:

Let your mother sit in the shade and direct you to do what she would do if her back wasn't bad.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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What exactly are you tring to grow perenials, Annuals, or vegetables. if you know your grow zone it would easier to tell what and how you should grow your plants Chuckie
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On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 16:10:34 +0000, polywogle

Mmm...some of the most gorgeous plants and shrubs in our nurseries and gardens come from South Africa!

Is it the heat, or is it the fumes from the stuff you put in the pool? Or is there underground leakage of chlorinated water?

It's very nice that you are planning to help your mother with gardening. Sounds like you need to educate yourself on plants, which can be a fun process, trust me!
To begin with, there are garden books in your neighborhood book some of which specifically deal with your local climate.
Also in the library, if you can't afford books.
Also, go to your neighorhood plant nursery and ask them what would work. Take a diagram of your garden; a rough sketch is good enough.
Try to tell the nursery where the sun hits your garden at various times of the year. I realize you haven't been studying the sun's movements, so this is a good time to start. Ex: Do not put shade plants where they will be scorched by strong Western sun. But don't put them in total darkness either!
Also, of course, and this is the biggie in our lives: The Web. Sometimes I think youngsters don't appreciate the incredible resources available at the click of a mouse. No need to go to the library, get help from a reference librarian [1], go through umpty books, and make copies of needed articles, etc.
[1] Reference librarians are among the GREATEST resources of any civilized society. People don't realize the amount of training that goes into that job.]
So, to identify plants suitable for your area, go to the Web, search via Google or some other search engine. Input the keywords that appear in your message:
Example: [exact location] South Africa. Small flowering shade plants. (BTW - there are not many such; flowering plants usually require sun. There is Clivia, which has gorgeous orange flowers; some Azaleas can manage in part shade
(I'm posting from Southern California Coastal, which is your basic Mediterranean climate; not too hot; not too cold = ideal! Only"downside" is a limited rainy season, +- November - March. But who knows what will happen, what with global warming...!]
Just a quick trip to the Web, since I don't know your exact location, elicited the name Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, Capetown. You could probably ask them for help/advice/buying plants, or referral to a Botanical Garden or other resource more suitable for your exact location.
OK - this is a a lot of information, but what it adds up to is this:
You need to educate yourself about what plants would do well in various parts of your garden. It's FUN!
-
Persephone
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Sout Africa has the greatest diversity and greatest number of native plant species than anywhere else on the planet. Many popular garden flowers and greenhouse plants originate from South Africa.
If you can't find any plants to your liking to grow, you surely haven't been looking very hard. Check with one of the many botanical gardens in your country for ideas on which plants to grow in your area.
<Persephone> wrote in message wrote:

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But how you keep all the rhinosauruses out of the garden, or the gorillas and orangutans from eating the plants???
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Persephone Wrote:

wow!! thanks for all the tips, i'm sure its gonna make a big diff in m education
the bed by the swimming pool is affected by the heat and som chlorinated water (and the dogs but i have a plan for them). I wa thinking of planting succulents there and covering the rest of the san with pretty gravel.
oh and is horse manure good for plants? (i know that it smells bette than cow manure and i can get it cheaply coz i own a horse hehe
-- polywogle
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On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 09:47:04 +0000, polywogle

AFAIK, manure has to be well-rotted. If you put it on fresh from the critter, it could burn plants. This is esp. true for chicken manure, but also for horsie doo-doo. So I hope you have a place to pile up the lovely stuff and let it age.
If somebody else has input on this manure-rotting, I'd like to get your .02. Thanks.
--
Persephone


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Not true chicken manure will not burn your plant if handled properly. When using it make sure it is dry spread it out to your preference amoug your plant but do pile it, because it will burn the soil in that area and you will not be able grow anything in that area. Chuckie
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Respectfully disagee. Chickie doo-doo is the most potent. It does have the capability of burning if (as you indicate) it is improperly applied, but most sources I have consulted in [censored] years of gardening hold that ALL manure should be well-rotted, or if you prefer the phrasing -- not hot from the out source <g>
Persephone
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A couple of the least root-burning poos are rabbit poo & llama poo. Even these SHOULD be composted before use. All others risk not only disease to family & pets, but will damage plants & beneficial microorganisms while encouraging harmful microorganisms. But it's one of the not-so-secret dirty little secrets of farming that whether its chickenshit or cowshit or shit from under rabbit hutches, slopping it on gardens mostly raw is a commonplace without a great number of ill health effects (by luck rather than by safety). For most of us, it would not be worth the possibility of salmonella, e-coli, plus any number of zoonotic pathogens passable to family members & pets, which certainly can result from spreading animal shit throughout one's garden then getting down on hands & knees to plant things or weed things & get shit instead of wholesome humus all over one's hands. Or even eating it if its in the lettuce garden. A hot compost kills all harmful pathogens & parasites found in poo, while breaking down into a wholesome even sweet-smelling organic compost.
-paghat the ratgirl
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Most chicken manure is well composted in the barn since most farms do not clean out their chicken coop or barn every single day. In fact anytime I get manure it has usually sat for six months or more. Also Cow manure pulled right out of the barn and put on the garden is very benificial. And if you are going to tell me about the health risk first reserch the health risks of commercial fertilizers. They are far more dangerous than natural manures Chuckie
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Persephone Wrote:

The horse manure is well rotte
-- polywogle
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