Harty Mum Question

I purchased a small harty mum in a container. If I keep it in my house with it survive? Would it be a perrential if I maintain it properly?
Thanks
Tom
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On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 08:47:52 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@city-net.com"

It won't grow well indoors, unless you have an ideal environment. You have a much better chance growing mums outdoors and pruning/fertilizing them as directed. Most people add the mums to the compost pile (or toss them out) after blooming.
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Depending upon where you live, I have seen mums planted outside and they do quite well as long as they are watered properly. In zone 7 (Arkansas) they did very well, and I have had good luck with them here in zone 5 (Kansas). I think the colors change after the first or second year, but that might be because our soil pH is close to neutral. They might like more acid.
Dwayne

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Dwayne wrote:

Zone 6 (Kentucky) is a thumbs up on growing outside. Just get them in the ground somewhere. I doubt that they'd survive in pots, especially further north.
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They'll also (usually) survive winters in Western NY (zones 5/6) if planted up against the foundation of the house or other structure that retains heat and has a southern exposure. Your mileage may vary.
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I plant mine out as soon as I can, generally they grow the following year and bloom and then disappear forever. dont know why. Ingrid
On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 08:47:52 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@city-net.com"
wrote:

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Hey Ingrid, That's exactly what happened to ours! It bloomed (sparsely) the next year then bit the dust, just like my poinsettia. When taken from an ideal greenhouse environment, they just barely thrive.
On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 14:06:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

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odder yet, mine do fabulously well the following year (if they survive at all) and THEN they disappear. Ingrid

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

My dad in law could grow mums "football" real well in his sandy soil. This was in N. Jersey Langhurst close to the oceaan. We can't do it and treat them like annuals. The local mums that are dug around here seem to not be perennial yet the same folks have them up for sale every fall. I got to stop in some time and ask what the secret is. I'll offer a Japanese maple to loosen their tongues ;))
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade

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