Ground Cover

I have recently cleared a hill in my yard. It's too steep for a lawn mower so I want to plant a ground cover. Does anyone have any suggesstions for a nice ground cover? I live in the mid-atlantic and the hill is fairly sunny. The hill is about 20' down and 60' across. Maybe more than one ground cover?
Thanks, Jamie
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I have a steep slope. Planted azaleas and blue rug juniper. The deer keep eating the azaleas, but the juniper has done exceptionally well with little care and the color is a nice contrast to the lawn. I planted annuals (mostly marigolds) for a couple years until the juniper spread. It is holding the hillside with no erosion issues. We have acid soil. You can use mulch and/or stones to hold the slope until the roots become established. The stones I used are now hidden by the juniper.

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You can't go wrong with Sedum and Sempervivum.

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What was there prior to your clearing it?
-- David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7) email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com http://beyondgardening.com/Albums

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It was covered with multiflora rose...I hate that stuff. It took me two years to get rid of it. The first year I chopped it down with a machette. The second year, after it all died, I cut it up with a lawn mower and raked it out. I hope I never have to do it again!

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I like Vinca...mine has pretty purplish blue flowers on it, and it seems to spread pretty quickly.
Angie in the boonies of East Texas

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junkyardcat wrote:

If you choose vinca, use only V. minor. V. major can be very invasive.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David Ross wrote:

Vinca minor here in the PNW is *very* *aggressive*.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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--MS_Mac_OE_3193645219_407622_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
in one word: SPEARMINT!! smells great, nice low growing, spreads like crazy...and just think: on the 1st saturday in may, yule be able to make mint juleps for the whole neighbourhood!!!!

--MS_Mac_OE_3193645219_407622_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding
<HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Ground Cover</TITLE></HEAD> <BODY> in one word: &nbsp;<FONT COLOR="#008000">SPEARMINT</FONT>!! &nbsp;smells great, nice low growing, spreads like crazy...and just think: &nbsp;on the 1st saturday in may, yule be able to make mint juleps for the whole neighbourhood!!!!<BR> <BR> &gt; From: &quot;Jim&quot; &lt; snipped-for-privacy@home.net&gt;<BR> &gt; Newsgroups: rec.gardens<BR> &gt; Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2005 20:16:04 -0500<BR> &gt; Subject: Ground Cover<BR> &gt; <BR> &gt; I have recently cleared a hill in my yard. &nbsp;It's too steep for a lawn mower <BR> &gt; so I want to plant a ground cover. &nbsp;Does anyone have any suggesstions for a <BR> &gt; nice ground cover? &nbsp;I live in the mid-atlantic and the hill is fairly sunny. <BR> &gt; The hill is about 20' down and 60' across. &nbsp;Maybe more than one ground <BR> &gt; cover?<BR> &gt; <BR> &gt; Thanks,<BR> &gt; Jamie <BR> &gt; <BR> &gt; <BR> </BODY> </HTML>
--MS_Mac_OE_3193645219_407622_MIME_Part--
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Apart from the possibility of becoming invasive & the impossibility of getting it to stay just where it was planted, it dies back in autumn & looks like hell so makes for a poor choice of dominant groundcover. I did see a garden in which mints & golden creeping jenny were used to good effect as the dominant groundcovers; when they were in full take-over-the-world mode they looked spiffy, but come winter the whole area blackened then looked empty.
-paghat the ratgirl
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For a short groundcover that almost never needs watering & loves full sun, sunroses form lovely carpets dense enough that weeds can't get through. Various cultivars come in every cool color except blue, & even when not flowering they provide a varied texture because the leaves are varied from cultivar to cultivar, from grey-blue to shiny green. For a taller groundcover, rockroses have much the same value, but not in as wide an array of colors. If you did create a "sea" of short sunroses, its short height could be broken up at intervals by Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) that come in many colors (the blue one would add the one missing color to the sunrose array) or an upright species rugosa rose.
-paghat the ratgirl
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do you think that the sunroses would work on a VERY steep hill? like the cliff i have in my front yard facing the lake?
--
read and post,
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I've never personally seen sunroses growing on a sheer cliff, but in their native range wild ones are known to establish themselves even on limestone cliffs which are pretty harsh places to grow, so I would assume if there's any soil at all to get started on, the fancier cultivars would do fine. And if it's not quite a cliff but really only a steep-steep slope, that's the sort spot they particular like, full sun with sharply draining soil.
-paghat the ratgirl
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Jim wrote:

Two low-growing ground covers are pink clover (knotweed, Persicaria capitata, hardy to about 18F) and cinquefoil (Potentilla neumanniana, hardy to 0F). They spread in solid mats of foliage 1-3 inches thick and have nice small flowers. You can then plant shrubs, bulbs, or tall perennials through them.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David Ross Wrote:

Jamie, you might want to check out which plants are considere invasives in your area. What may be a great garden plant in one are of the country may be an invasive in your area. Go to www.google.co and put in the search box: invasive plant + Your State
You can also get information on any recommendations at google. Best t use botanical names or check out common names as several plants can hav the same common name. An example is the recommendation of pink clover. Botancially, pink clover - Trifolium repens is NOT knotweed - Persicari capitata. http://tinyurl.com/5rly5 http://tinyurl.com/4vf54
Here's a site where you can check the botanical names of many plant using the common name. Not everything is listed, but it might b helpful. http://www.mswn.com/Cross%20Index.htm
Newt Both Vinca minor and Vinca major have escaped into the wild are can b invasive in woodlands, so best to plant where it is contained and can' roam into wild areas
-- Newt
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Jim Wrote:

Hi Jamie,
I like Cereus-validus's suggestion of Sempervirens and Sedums. Als consider a creeping euonymous, but they are best used in a containe area. There are many different varieties. http://tinyurl.com/3snen
Here's the main page. You can search by 'evergreen'. Do make sur they are evergreen in your hardiness zone. http://classygroundcovers.com /
If you aren't sure of your hardiness zone you can use this zip cod zone finder. http://www.garden.org/zipzone /
I too live in the Mid-Atlantic area in Maryland. There will be a plan swap through GardenWeb.com on May 14th in Burtonsville, Maryland between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. If you don't have anything t trade, but will bring food, you can probably go home with a trunk ful of free goodies, and probably be able to find some of what you need. Just let me know if you are interested and I'll send you the details. There will also be some in other states as well.
You can check the references of mailorder sites here. http://davesgarden.com/gwd /
New
-- Newt
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