Grass seed instead of fertilizer or weedkiller

I'm a gardening newbie and I hate lawn maintenance.
I was told that instead of spending $$ on fertilizer and/or weedkillers, if we spread grass seed on the lawn regularly it will take care of the health and thickness of the lawn. Also since there's no place for the weeds to grow, they won't.
Does anyone use this concept? Does this work? It looks too easy and simple to be true.
Thanks.
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On Thu, 29 Apr 2004 10:29:58 -0400, ted wrote:

Well I'm not sure if that works but I do spread around grass seed every spring all over the lamns. I also use weed killer and fertilizer.
Last year ground ivy got really bad so this year I'm trying a few things, Ortho weed killer (so far 3 applications and nothing is happening to it) and the borax treatment on a few spots for experimenting.
Man ground ivy is MURDER to deal with. Pulling it all is out, there is just way too much of it for that.
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On 29 Apr 2004 07:29:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (ted) wrote:

You're right--it's too simple and easy to be true. A nice lawn requires a lot of maintenance. But overseeding reduces the amount of weed killers and crab grass. Overseed at the proper time and apply a starter (not regular) fertilizer at the same time. Unfortunately, quality seed costs money.
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On 29 Apr 2004 07:29:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (ted) wrote:

Don't know about regular over-seeding, but it sounds reasonable. I think many will tell you that a healthy, growing lawn is the best weed-preventer there is. And I seem to see more problems (other than environmental) with over-treatment than benefits.
The owner of a newish house across the street has been trying for 3 years to achieve a golf-course lawn. She mows often (too often and too low, IMO), and is always out spreading or spraying *something* around. Her lawn looked lovely -- bright green and perfect at the end of winter. In about 6 weeks, her attentions have resulted in big patches of brown, and you can see some of the straight lines invovlved in either fertilizing or weed-killing (we're not pals, so I don't know exactly).
My own lawn isn't weed-free, but it's green and respectable looking, and the only maintenance it's had for years is mowing every 7-10 days and (very) occasionally spot-treating dandelions.
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It's true that canopy closure (no bare soil for weeds) is wonderful weed control. It's also true that overseeding will help an ailing lawn... but it won't do much if you butcher the mowing and if the soil is compacted, poor pH, nutrient-deficient and/or you overseed in such a manner that the seed has no chance to grow. Or if you choose seed that is unsuited for your growing conditions.
Read up on basic lawn care: my favorite book for beginners is Rodale's Chemical-Free Yard and Garden, by Carr et al. Read it, paying special attention to the first few chapters on soil and water. Get a soil test; correct any soil problems; choose species of grasses suitable for your condition (talk to your extension service for what does well in your area). Choose low-maintenance grasses. Mow correctly. Fertilize when needed. Much of good lawn care involves a lot of planning, very little work, but consistent work.
Or ditch the lawn for something else that suits you better. But check local laws, homeowner associations and similar pitfalls before you make major plans.
Kay Lancaster snipped-for-privacy@fern.com
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