Grape Arbor

Hi - I've just recently (within the past year) purchased a house with some space to grow and a grape arbor. I just now subscribed to this group as my previous experience living in urbanity has me unprepared to tackle some of the goals I have for my space. Any help would be awesome! The grape arbor is Concord and very mature. The base is thick, solid and woody - it grows about 7.5 feet up, at least 20 feet wide, and about 6 feet deep (as well as meandering along the side fence). Unfortunately, it's currently been cultured to grow towards my house over the patio. I'm very interested in trying to get the arbor to grow the other way (in the depth dimension - not width) - either by forcing it somehow, or transplanting the base and rotating the plant. I have two questions: Is this possible? And if so, then what is the best way to get the plant to grow in the opposite direction?
---- A further description of the problem; potentially opaque If this is unclear, consider viewing the plant from the top down - it would look like a 20'x6' square. If you consider one of the corners to be the trunk of the arbor, then I want to flip the square along the adjacent 20' side. Notice, I can accomplish the same task by digging up the trunk and moving it to the corner opposite along the adjacent 20' side while rotating it 180 degrees.
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Thanks for your help - I look forward to being an active member here!
Have a great afternoon.
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I'm not sure if you should try spinning the plant in the manner you suggest. If the plant is as large as you suggest and firmly rooted in the ground (as most arbors are) digging up a plant of that size might be an exausting process, not to mention the damage the grapes's roots will take. If the plant is not in a damaging or obstructive (to other plants, a view, or access to utilities) i'd reccomend leaving it in place if you want it to survive. Moving a mature plant purely for aesthetic value can be a disappointing and expensive process.
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Well - normally I would want to leave the arbor in place. But unfortunately, since I'm still in a slightly urban environment, backyard space is at a premium. I'd like to use the space that the arbor is occupying (since it is closer to my house) yet retain the arbor. Perhaps it would be easier to try and regrow a new arbor? How long does it take for a Concord arbor like this to grow to this size? Thanks for your reply - take care. Matty U!
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Speaking about grapes, I have a three year old plant that's been severely pruned each year for fruiting purposes.
What is the typical root structure [depth and width] of such a plant? I'm considering moving it and don't want to kill it if the roots are delicate.
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