Gorse

Ah, memories of my youth in the Irish hills and the prickly gorse bush with it's gorgeous yellow flower that blankets the landscape. So any chance it might grow here in the US, Zone 6???
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Of gorse, of gorse!
The joke is on you, gorse isn't even native to Ireland!
Why would anyone want to deliberately grow such a nasty weed?
http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfp/pubs/interest/gorse/gorse.htm
http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/LANDS/Weeds/Gorse.htm

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Hold your horses there mucker.
"Gorse originates in western Europe."
Since when is Ireland not part of Western Europe, you old anti-EU Isolationist, you?
Thanks for the links ;)
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Don't give me none of your blarney.
Hate to break it to you, bucko, but Ireland is but a wee island west of England and not part of mainland Europe.

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True but the link you sent mentioned "Western Europe" not mainland Europe. Or are you saying Ireland is not part of Europe at all. Maybe it's on the North American continent!!? Or is it simply adrift in the ocean, "contintentless", or it "uncontinented". Good laughs my friend.
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Ireland is the remnant of Atlantis, silly. I hear there were no snacks in Atlantis, & because of it there are to this day no snacks in Ireland. Would I have them confiscated if I visited Dublin bringing along my own snacks?
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Give it up, O'Spammy. Nobody give a haggis.
You should be more worried that somebody might steal your "lucky charms" while you are spending all your time doing the "river dance"!

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But a Paghaggis would be nice.

--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Um, good luck.
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Do you listen to Howard Stern? Well, if you don't, never mind. If you do, think Yucko the Clown. That guy makes me fall on the floor laughing. He reminds me of our own loveable Yucko the Cereoid! I think his deprecating humor is an acquired taste. Forgive me if I acquire it.
Victoria
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Are you curious yellow or are you curious blue?
Mix the two together and you get Irish green!
Your question was answered and you should just leave it at that, Spambot, instead of pining away over noxious weeds and the land of drunken poets. If you ever sober up from drinking all that green beer, you just might be able to get a life but I doubt it.
Shown up by the likes of you? Don't make me laugh. You must be one of the little people we hear so much about. Who stole your pot of gold?
Um, good luck.
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And leave you to puff your chest thinking your a big ol' funny guy? Nah, you demonostrate far too much much ingorance not to have a laugh at.

I think I did alright. Keep it coming ...
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To answer your question without the accompanying silliness, zone 6 is too cold for gorse - it requires a moderated, more maritime climate to thrive. Probably a good thing, as it is incredibly invasive in areas where it can grow and is considered a noxious weed. Its sale and growth is restricted. Enjoy it in your memories - that's where it safely belongs.
pam - gardengal
pam - gardengal
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"....... Ah, memories of my youth in the Irish hills and the prickly gorse bush with it's gorgeous yellow flower that blankets the landscape. So any chance it might grow here in the US, Zone 6??? ......."
Wild Gorse is a menace though the old Welsh saying is that "Kissing is in season whilst Gorse is in flower" the seed pods burst explosively throwing the seed up to 20 ft or so.BUT There is a very nice Double form which is sterile so no fear of seeds or spreading.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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words:

For those who aren't familiar with gorse..although the main season of flowering is spring, it can flower intermittently all year round :-) In Spring here, the flowers are so dense and thick the green parts of the plant are almost hidden; wild hillsides covered in gold are a wonderful sight, and their heady but subtle scent (fresh coconut) is even more fabulous. I often cut branches for a big vase in the house.
It only spread out of control and became a "menace" when farming methods modernised. Before than, gorse was regularly harvested which kept it in better check. It was greatly valued for its versatile uses such as firing bread ovens and cooking ranges (it burns very hot even when green); the flowers were used for dyeing fabric; the evergreen branches would be run through a crusher before being fed to cattle as a winter feed. Also, wet laundry would be hung over the bushes because the small thorns prevented it blowing away; and it could be trimmed into a very strong stock-proof hedge round veg plots.
In Scotland it can survive (green) to at least -20C. It's unusual for such lows to persist for more than a few days at a time. Colder than that, and bushes either die or are severely cut back.

I've only recently acquired the double form; flower buds are forming and anticipation is mounting. I've planted it next to a low ceanothus and am hoping the gold and blue will flower together.
ISTR that it's not quite as robust and cold-hardy as the wild single form ?
Janet.(Isle of Arran)
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Very interesting stuff, Janet! Sounds like anyone who lives wherever it already grows anyway (& wouldn't be worried about it as an invasive weed) would really want to give it consideration. I wonder if the less robust doubleform is not an invasive problem for elsewhere?
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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"......... I wonder if the less robust doubleform is not an invasive problem for elsewhere? ......."
As I said, the double form is sterile, and gorse is not a suckering shrub so cant be invasive. On the point of cloths drying, for years I had a great clump of Genista hispanica (Spanish Gorse), which in the spring is covered with soft flowering stems of bright yellow flowers, but go in about 4 or 5 inches and you hit the spines. After the flowers are over you are left with a large mound of thorns, this "Hedgehog" is great for drying woollens as they are fully supported, cant get blown around, get air from both sides and lift off with no chance of snagging a fibre. A great plant.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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from snipped-for-privacy@netscapeSPAM-ME-NOT.net (paghat) contains these words:

I had the wild single gorse in my last garden and enjoyed it; it does seed round a lot but is taprooted so easily pulled out while young.

I don't think so; as David said, it's sterile.
Janet.
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contains

<SNIP>
Thanks for the info Pam and David. I do recall using the flowers for dyeing eggs at Eastertime.
Great information.
Gary
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