Garden hose

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I have two of the home depot variety "kink free" garden hoses. They are far from kink free, in fact they kink all the time when you stretch them out. When you roll them back up you have to keep flipping the hose the right way so it won't kink.
However, I have a very old hose probably more than 15 years I found in this garage and it never kinks. It does not kink because it does not flatten not even a little bit. I think it's made of rubber. Are those better hoses than the modern day vinyl hoses?
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

I remember admiring a Model A, and I asked the owner where he got the replacement rubber, it was perfect. He said "Replacement, that's original!".
I have a 1" rubber hose that would never think of kinking, of course, this is a monster.
My guess is that thinner hoses will be more likely to kink, look for substance, no matter what you get, if this is a concern.
Jeff

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jeff wrote:

Good point. I have 19mm (3/4in) and 12mm (1/2in) made of the same material, the thinner kinks much more.
David
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Hi, You bet. Heavy duty industrial/commercial one. I have one and it is so heavy and kink free but hard to handle.
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IMO, yes, it is better, but after 15 years it may be deteriorating. If you want the best possible hose reel, go to www.rapidreel.com After curing every other type for years, I spent the money and have never been happier using the hoses and being able to re-wind it easily. .
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All brand new hose is prone to kinking. Hose needs to be broken in, so that it loses it's factory "memory" (from being tightly wound in its sale mode), with use it will become softer and more flexible (lower quality hose may never become soft and flexible, and in fact over time tends to harden). And when you say "roll them back up" do you mean on the ground or on a hose reel? Winding hose on the grond automatically causes hose to twist, whech will caue it to kink in use. It's best to use a hose reel, and still there is a proper way to wind hose on a reel.

Rubber hoses are not better, they're different... they're more abrasion resistant and can better withstand being constantly driven over... but they are less flexible and are much heavier to drag around than vinyl hose. Were I going to be using a hose mostly over a paved area and/or where there are sharp protruding objects like inside a factory building, and over reletively short distances I'd choose rubber... for garden and lawn areas I'd choose vinyl. Generally for home use vinyl hose is a better choice. For commercial use rubber hose is generally a better choice; rubber hose costs more but can withstand the rigors of hard use and abuse much better than vinyl.
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Good hoses are still available. They just cost more. Most people do not understand the principles behind coiling. Hose is like wire rope. It will coil, but it doesn't twist very much. Lay out a stretch of steel wire, and you notice that if you turn one end, the other end turns the same amount. Weaker things will spin a couple of times before the other end starts to move. Over time, this bending develops a memory in the tube, and then it becomes harder to straighten it out.
Figure eight'ing hose will allow storage without twisting. A coil method of one coil one way, and the next reversed works great, but few can master it. You can properly coil wire rope using this technique, then pull it all out straight without a spiral in it. Same for hose.
As for using reels ............ lots of variables. Hoses go onto reels much differently if they are pressurized than if not pressurized. Some hoses are weak, and will flatten when rolled up on a reel, and others won't. Then there's unreeling. Have you left it full of water, and now it has frozen? Did you reel it up right and even? Reels work pretty good, and there's all grades, some even with level wind mechanisms.
But knowing the principles of the whole thing help to gain predictable results.
HTH
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

By far the best method to use.
One note though is that once a cable / hose / wire has been abused and kinked, it won't coil well no matter what technique you use.
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things kink so easly I'm ready to throw the whole lot of them in the trash and go buy an industrial quality hose that I can use without kinking....
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My epiphany came when I had a driveway put in. The company crushed my hose in front of the house. They bought me another. A Goodyear 1" black 75 footer with nice cast brass fittings. I tell you what, that hose was probably $50 or more. More than I would have ever spent. It's still going strong after five years, and doesn't look used. I've bought a couple since then, and there's just no comparison. With the money I've spent for shitty hoses, I could have good ones everywhere I have hoses. The end sprayers thread on so much better, and the hose bibb connectors don't leak, too.
Steve
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Meh. I'd rather have a good quality product then a piece of junk that needs replacing periodically. A warranty doesn't do me any good when I have a broken tool that I need now and the stores are closed until Monday. Case in point - I made the mistake of buying a cheap off-brand tiller (you think I would have learned by now to NEVER buy cheap off-brand products). After two years the handle breaks. Replacement? No problem! Just wait 5 weeks for us to get one from the factory. Spring...ground is dry, but rain is coming next week. Till the ground now or wait another month or two for another break in the rain. And my tiller is broken and the best warranty in the world does me no good because I bought a cheap made in China plastic piece of crap and it takes 5 weeks to get a replacement handle. Moral of the story. Never buy cheap plastic made in China (or made anywhere else for that matter) crap. Fork out the bucks for something good so it doesn't bite you later.
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 21:59:46 -0700, Zootal wrote:

While that may true for complicated equipment with motors like tillers, lawnmowers, and snow blowers that's not the case for simple things like hoses. Pity the fool who buys the cheap snow blower and spends space storing it all summer only to have it crap out during the first blizzard. A hose is kind of hard to screw up manufacturing wise and if it does break they're trivial to fix with splices. I only buy the cheapest hoses sold and my hoses go through the most brutal environmental conditions on my rooftop garden. They stay up there year round and suffer intense heat sitting on a flat rubber roof in the summer to intense sub zero cold during the winter. Only twice in seven years did a bubble appear in the middle one of my main transfer hose that needed to be cut out but that only costs a few dollars each time. Sometimes leaks pop at ends of tributary watering garden hoses due to stress from changing out watering wands but then again, that's trivial and cheap to fix as well. Why spend $50 on a hose when there's one for $20? The thing I do buy quality are hose splices, new ends, and splitters, I only get the copper stuff. The plastic splitters and splices never lasted more than a week in my garden.
I can't believe some of you people get warranties for something as simple as a hose and are organized enough to keep track of your hose warranty. I'd rather fix the damn hose myself than even drive to some big box store, stand in line, and explain to some bored clerk that my hose is broke and I want a new one. Actually, I'd be kind of embarrassed doing something like that. Some people, however, have no shame LOL.
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"Mark Anderson" wrote:

That they have no shame is right... 99.9 percent of garden hose failure is due to user abuse, which is very easy to ascertain, at least you are honest enough to admit that you abuse your garden hoses. When the big box stores replace garden hoses (and other merchandise) under warranty no questions asked it's really for customer good will. The big stores have an agreement with the manufacturers to share the loss., and they know that the products are abused but they sell enough volume that the loss is spread amongst all who buy those products by selling at higher prices. The honest consumers get hosed in all orifices, wealth has been spread around for many years, losses have also been spread around for just as long, if not longer... such policies are nothing new but of late the greed factor has crossed the line and so there'll be hell to pay when it all backfires. Only individuals can decide what level of charity/good will is comfortable and a good cause, but when people are forced to give charity to the undeserving they simply stop giving anything. It's by no accident that Democrat and Depression begin with the same letter, same as Republican and Revolution.
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I'd like to thank you for impetus to look about and found
<http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/History_n2/a.html
NEAT.
Bill who thinks history always written by the victor
--

Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

http://prototype.nytimes.com/gst/articleSkimmer /
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 13:21:14 +0000, brooklyn1 wrote:

I too find it incredulous that the Democrats hoisted Herbert Hoover into the Presidency.
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"Zootal" wrote:

Apples/Oranges... no comparison between a tiller and a garden hose. For a few bucks one can easily replace a garden hose with a quick trip to any store that sells gardening stuff. A tiller is not so inexpensive to replace (although were I in your spot I'd have rented one for the day). The moral is not about cheap price so much as it is about never buy machinery except from a reliable service center nearby that stocks the parts for and services what it sells. I bought my tiller from the Authorized dealership in town that sells all sorts of farming equipment including huge tractors... when a belt broke on my practically new tiller requiring a couple days wait for a new one to ship they delivered a loaner tiller right to my door, and picked it up three days later when they brought the new belt, installed and test ran it. Never buy mechanical equipment except from a reliable dealership that services what they sell. I would never buy a new tiller, mower, chainsaw, snowblower and such from a big box hardware just because it's $30 cheaper.
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In article

"I'd have to retrain the gardener!"
OK, garden owners, get your lemonade, umbrellas, and whip, and get to gardening.
--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
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I recently replaced two old plastic 50' hoses with two 50' rubber hoses I bought at Lowes. These new hoses have not kinked, so far.
I found if I coiled the old plastic hoses while they were filled with water, they coiled much easier and never kinked. Once I had them coiled, I drained the water off.
My main complaint with the plastic hoses was that they deteriorated very fast in the hot Texas sun. The rubber hoses, so far, do not seem to be damaged by the sun.
Freckles
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Same thing I have said before. Sears sells a life time warranted rubber hose. If anything ever goes wrong with it you take it back and they give you a new one. They are heavier, but it is worth it for the fact that when you pull a kink in one all you have to do is untwist it and the kink goes away. They cost more, I paid about $35 for my 70 foot one, but since I won't ever have to buy a replacement for it it is well worth the price.
Bill
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I agree. I bought a heavy duty 100' rubber hose from sears many years ago and it still kink-free and in great shape. I use on of those free standing reels with a big crank from one of the big home improvement stores. It works pretty well winding neatly and the hose is enclosed which helps it's lifespan.
I bought a few more 50' rubber hoses for the front yard and they are pretty good, but will kink on occasion. I attribute this to the crappy wall-mounted reel they are on more than the hose themselves. Once we get the furniture we are holding for my daughter out of the garage later this summer, I''' be able to put a better reel in the garage for these hoses.
Jon
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