Eating radish greens

Does anyone know if there's any problems related to eating radish greens? Any poisonous types of radish greens or some such? Has anyone ever heard of such a thing as a poisonous radish green?
I've looked through Google and I see a ton of suggestions to use radish greens on sandwiches, in salads with other greens, sprinkled with grated cheese, etc.
-- Jim Carlock Post replies to newsgroup.
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 04:26:23 GMT, "Jim Carlock"

Radish greens are one of the many leaf vegetables used in Korean cooking. They are definitely edible, like mustard greens only much milder.
--
Chris Green

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What's really good are the seedpods! Let a few radishes go to seed and harvest the pods, they're great in salads.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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Pick them young, the greens get coarse as they get older, use radishes as row markers-they germinate fast.
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Thanks for the replies and comments. I look forward to more!
I've found an interesting page describing radishes.
http://www.floridata.com/ref/R/raph_sat.cfm
It identifies the radish as the most widely grown crop in Japan, that radishes contain large amounts of diatase which aids in the digestion of starches.
It also mentions that certain radishes grow to 60 pounds. Fascinating!
Some radishes require a temp of 45 or lower before seed pods form. So I'm not sure that these will grow seed pods here in Tampa, Florida, where the average annual temperature is about 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
That page indicates that radishes originated from charlock which is grown in Europe and the UK, but then mentions that Egyptians grew radish 3000 years before Christ. I couldn't find any other references to an earlier use of the crop. So I'm not sure what to make of that.
Found references to Athenians using radishes as punishment for adultery... and references to Confucious eating radishes.
Thanks and happy holidays!
-- Jim Carlock Post replies to newsgroup.
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Jim Carlock wrote:

I wonder where they put them as a punishment?!?!!??!
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 04:26:23 GMT, "Jim Carlock"

Just trolling?
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How was the question in any way trolling? Jim isn't a troll.
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Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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How could anyone say he saw many mainstream *recipes* for a food and then ask if it were poisonous? I believe it's kinder to label the poster as a troll than unbelievably, um, lacking in reasoning power.
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The post asks if *some* radish varieties are poisonous, and also if *some* people may have problems eating radish greens. Thinking that the fact that some people eat radish greens does not imply that the type of radish greens he happens to grow might not be safe for him is not indicative of lack of reasoning power. You can also find many mainstream recipes for a food like mushrooms. Do you want to conclude that the mushroom you find in your backyard is therefore safe?
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I was going to go along with Frogleg's idea that I was trolling. But I was thinking along the lines that I was using Google as a trolling net to gather information, rather than as an ugly creature waiting to lure little children into my home.
The question is a legitimate question. I know nothing about eating radish greens. I'm fairly new at messing with growing various plants. I've had success with cucumbers, basil, hungarian wax peppers and some cherry radish. I've failed miserably with tomatoes, chives, onions, squash, pumpkins, cabbage, lettuce and carrots.
Anyways, being that I'm ignorant about radish, it's an appropriate question to ask. And YES, I was trolling through Google looking for answers to my question, but I wasn't satisfied and it is a very valid question. The trolling there turned up some odd historical items, some amazing information about 60 pound radish, some interesting facts that radish are the MOST widely grown crop in Japan, and some other interesting details that radish aid in the digestion of starches.
If it disturbs someone, perhaps that one might want to talk about what is so disturbing, perhaps a bad experience with a radish? ;-)
-- Jim Carlock Post replies to newsgroup.
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Jim...whattya mean, you failed with tomatoes? Where do you live, and what went wrong? If they were supported in some way, how was that done?
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"Doug Kanter" wrote:

Had them out in the direct sun and just overfertilized so they never fruited, then went on vacation for a week and they didn't get any water during that week, and that killed pretty much everything I was messing with. Had it all in the direct sun over the summer months. Learned quite a bit from it.
I've got four in a small pot right at the moment. If I put them outside, the leaves start to get real heavy and limp. I don't know what's causing that. One is flowering, has some very tiny flowers starting up and one little bigger (3/4 inch) that is bloomed. I accidently pulled one of the tiny tiny flowers off, so I decided to take that one apart and look at what's inside. Very interesting. Looked like it had a fruit starting. I've read that a tuning fork could be used to get them to produce, you know of anything else that might help with an indoor tomato plant? Somewhere I read that one must flip the flower. I'm not sure what that really means, I'm thinking along the lines like flicking someone's ear, and if that is the case, maybe a jet of air would work, or giving it a raspberry?
The four tomato plants in the pot are kinda welded in there at the moment. I tried to pull the biggest one out but gave up on that. I'm going to let it remain as an indoor plant, and I'm thinking raspberries will get it to fruit.
Now back to the topic of radish. Seems like they don't last too long in the fridge. There anyway to help keep radish a little longer?
-- Jim Carlock Post replies to newsgroup.
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Even though some plants love direct sun, that doesn't mean their roots can be at the same temperature. You have your tomatoes in pots - that's the first thing to eliminate. If you can't plant them in the ground, you need to find a way to shade the pots. And, if they're in clay pots, get them into plastic pots - the biggest you can find and deal with, and in light colors. Clay dries out quickly and sucks the moisture right out of the soil.
I grew tomatoes in large pots last summer. I wasn't able to totally shade them. They needed two BUCKETS of water every day.
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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 04:27:49 GMT, "Jim Carlock"

When you see recipe suggestions (and food displayed in supermarkets) without warnings about toxicity, it logically follows that it is generally safe to eat. I believe rhubarb is marketed *without* the leaves, and any search on the subject would warn of irritating levels of oxalic acid in those leaves. You say you'd done a search on radish leaves and found recipes and no warnings. I can't think *what* could have made anyone ask this question; hence my label of 'troll.'
BTW, the picture of the "carrot" plant you referred us to is a leaf lettuce of some sort. Again, if you have *ever* seen carrots with tops in the grocery store, that question, too, appears to come from a desire to irritate rather then genuine puzzlement. You might just as well point to an oak tree and say "is that a carrot?"
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So is Jim an elf or one of Santa's helpers?
wrote:

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That would fall under the topic of "soul food"! Don't forget the bacon fat and ham hocks!!!

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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 12:23:14 GMT, "Cereus-validus..."

Spell that "soul" with an "e" and you're in good company. Koreans grow many varieties of radish, some just for their greens, which find their way into soups and kimchi.
--
Chris Green

>"Jim Carlock" < snipped-for-privacy@localhost.com> wrote in message
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The first time my neighbor ate them, he got a flat tire and his dog died. I'd be very careful if I were you.
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That sure is one severe case of flatulence!!!

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