Dying mint...

Hi all,
Some couple of months ago I cut a number stems from my mint plant and placed them in water. After a few weeks, white roots started growing. The intention being to replant the mint in other places.
Well, the first plant I planted grew and is doing fine. I did this before winter. The next plants I placed in pots (indoors) just died away.
Is it the wrong time of year to do this procedure or am I doing something wrong?
Thanks, Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MaxMustermann wrote:

It's often difficult for cuttings to survive being potted if they were rooted in water. The survival is much better if you start them in a potting mix.
I find the best mix for cuttings is a 50-50 mix of peat moss and "washed" plaster sand. This is the basis of my regular potting mix described at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_potting_mix.html . However, for cuttings, I omit the compost and omit ALL nutrients. While compost contains many beneficial micro-organisms, it also contains some that can cause cuttings to rot. Nutrients are not needed until good root growth is achieved and the cut heals; before then, nutrients can also promote rot. In any case, mint will thrive in a "lean" mix without many nutrients, although some nitrogen is needed if you harvest the mint frequently.
Finally, there is the problem of growing mint indoors. Mint is really not a house plant. In the winter, heating a home can make the air too dry. Mint requires a lot of water, in both the soil and the air.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MaxMustermann wrote:

Hello, Max,
I always transfer my mint outdoors after I root it. I can't say whether that is a good solution for you, unless I know where you live. I'm in San Jose, California, which has a Mediterranean climate, conducive to growing mint. I have also had mint in pots die, but only after it had grown for quite a while, thus exhausting the resources in the pot. Did you get growth? Flowers? How long did the plants last before they died?
+-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+ | Ladasky Home Solar, Inc.: blowing sunshine up your | | power grid since March 24, 2005. Fiat lux! | +-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+ | Uptime Downtime kWh generated kWh consumed | | 317 days none 5803 6000 | +-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cutting survival through an indoor winter are low. You can have all sorts of infections. Mint is best transplanted from place to place by taking suckers with roots. You can do it in the spring, if the weather is mild and you water well they will survive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am puzzled by mint. It grows so vigourously outdoors, but when I transferred some plants to pots to grow indoors in the winter, they just died on me. I conclude that it won't do well indoors, at least not here (dry house, less light in winter).
Andrew

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem was you didn't plant the mint in the ground next to the lawn. Mint knows when it's planted next to the lawn, then it spreads like wild fire in every direction. :)
-S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.