daffodill bulbs

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I'm no gardener but have had the unfortunate task of tending my father's grave. I planted some daff bulbs last autumn and had a beautiful display but the flowers are now dying off. I shall soon be re-planting with summer plants. Should I save the daff bulbs for next year, or shoud they be discarded and buy new ones again in the autumn?
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On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 16:09:09 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

Just leave 'em be. They will be back, year after year.
I'm sorry for your loss, whenever it was.
Care Charlie
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On 4/20/2008 4:45 PM, Charlie wrote:

Daffodills are quite hardy. They will survive most winters, even with snow and freezing weather. Just plant summer annuals over them without digging them up.
The one problem you might have is if the cemetary maintenance crew mows over your father's grave. Cutting the daffodill foliage before it turns yellow and dies will weaken the bulbs. If this happens, you might as well dig up the bulbs and trash them.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David E. Ross wrote:

I thought you could dig them up, with tops, store in a paper bag in the dark until tops die off, and replant next year? Or am I getting confused? :)
--
Pete C
London UK
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Pete C wrote:

Probably you are confused. It is necessary for the plants to remain in a normal growing state with roots and foliage intact so that they can support bulb growth which is what makes the new plants and flowers the next Spring. As soon as the plant has finished this process the foliage dies back and all that remains is the bulb (or bulbs) under the ground. Typically one can plant annuals around the remaining daffodil foliage to make it less obvious but even if the bulb is to be dug and re-planted in the Autumn it is necessary for the plant to go through its "recharging" routine to produce healthy bulbs. I normally clip the spent flower stem right after the flower fades to make the plants look less ragged but I would never remove any undiseased leaves.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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John McGaw wrote:

Thank you John :)
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Pete C
London UK
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John McGaw said:

No, that would be you. =) They will do fine, and even thrive, when done as Pete C questioned. We dug up thousands last spring, after they finished blooming. Laid them all out under an overhang to finish yellowing/drying, cut the foilage off, and stored them in bulb crates under a bench at work. I brought home several hundred last fall, and /every one/ of them is still in full bloom (3 weeks now). The rest, re-planted at work, are also thriving.

The roots, at that time, are playing a very minor role. The food is all being sent back down to the bulb for storage. It's being made in the leaves, not the roots.

And, they wouldn't be removed if dug up, intact. They'll still produce food, and you don't have the ragged, yellowed foilage in the bed.
Yup, you can plant around them. You can also dig them up, just fine.
--

Eggs

Most books now say our sun is a star. But it still knows how to change back
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On 4/21/2008 3:07 PM, Eggs Zachtly wrote:

Perhaps in England (where the original poster apparently lives), roots might not be important in allowing nutrients to migrate into the bulb.
In my climate, the relative humidity tends to be much lower (21% at noon). Without roots supplying moisture, the leaves would prematurely wilt and shrivel before they could complete their task. Also, leaving the bulbs in the ground through the summer keeps them cool; summer temperatures here often exceed 90F and even 100F.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Eggs Zachtly wrote: snip...

Guess we'll just have to disagree. It is amazing that you would claim that the plant's roots are "minor" given that this is the only way they absorb water and nutrients. Sure, photosynthesis is happening in the leaves but without water and soil nutrients nothing useful is going to be happening since it doesn't operate on atmospheric C02 alone. I will remain with the position that for best results the plants should stay exactly where they are until the foliage dies back. It is a minor drawback since daffodils don't hold onto their foliage all that long and can be easily screened from view.
Granted, the plants are amazingly tough and might well survive the treatment you describe but if it was the way to produce best-quality bulbs I'd expect the big growers to be doing it that way to save time. The Dutch growers would be able to put their new crop in the warehouses in April and spend the rest of the year sunning themselves in Majorca.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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John McGaw said:

No problem. I leave my bulbs at home in the ground, year round, cutting yellowing foilage as it appears. A bit time-consuming (there are seveal thousand bulbs), but the beds stay looking fairly fresh. My point was, it *is* fine to dig the bulbs up, lay them in a cool place to finish, and then remove the foilage. Planted that fall, they'll produce fine the following spring.

When bulb foilage begins to yellow, the roots are /not/ taking in water. If they're not taking in water, they're also *not* taking up nutrients. When the bulb finishes flowering, the roots are done, and begin to die off, same as the foilage. All food production is taking place above ground, and that food is being sent to the bulb for dormancy survival, and the following season's growth.

Again, there's nothing wrong with that method. Pete C's question was of digging them up (fine), storing them "in a paper bag in the dark until tops die off" (BAD idea). Lose the paper bag, and it will work, with no ill-effects.

Having never visited a "big grower", much less one in Holland, I can't comment on their production methods. Were you to ask one of them about the inner-workings of a bulb, and just what happens during it's life-cycle, I bet they'd tell you the same thing I stated above. ;)
--

Eggs

Do Amish people get one phone call when arrested?
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Guess you guys know daffodils are toxic, Some bulbs mixed with young onions would not be easy to discern not good. Sort of a text for murder she wrote.
Standard Major Disclaimer.
So Charlie and Billy when shall we party?
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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In article

You're not bring the onion dip are ya? Other than that, just let me get the cork out'en the bottle.
--

Billy


http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBB0svwMdY&feature=related

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Oh yeah......a garden party? Who brings the wine, who brings the botanicals, who brings what????
Charlie
"People came from miles around, everyone was there Yoko brought her walrus, there was magic in the air 'n' over in the corner, much to my surprise Mr. Hughes hid in Dylan's shoes wearing his disguise"
"But it's all right now, I learned my lesson well. You see, ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself"
~~Ricky
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Grew up with Nelson's.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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HUH? You mean as in same period or as in sharing Nehi's and Moon Pies?
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snipped-for-privacy@socket.net wrote:

Nah more like Rickey and David as human .
The past video seems to have a sort of power over words , Shame the content could not keep up unless we had access to amend . Hope this is a try.
Libraries , Libraries and examples of folks making sense.
Bill Tired....
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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In article

Strange thing about getting old. You're tired more often and you sleep less. Personally, I'm waiting for the malabsorbtion syndrome to kick in so that I can lose some weight, and recapture my boyish figure that is buried in here somewhere. Wait a minute, I don't have to worry about that anymore. Shrub has my weight loss worries covered. With any bad luck at all, I should be forty pounds lighter next year at this time, if I make it through the winter.
Wonder if any of that "shine" they are making for gasoline is ever goin' to make it to the "market" that will really appreciate it;-)
The body runs on acetate and it is only a tiny, teeny jump from ethanol to acetate. Beside, it's non-fattening and I got me five milk thistle plants to cover my liver;-) (again)
Yeah, yeah. Look out Bill, another one is zoning out . . . zzz
--

Billy


http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBB0svwMdY&feature=related

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snipped-for-privacy@socket.net wrote:

You in North Carolina now Charlie?
--

Billy


http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBB0svwMdY&feature=related

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Nah....I think I was in Headupmybuttville when I posted. ;-)
Charlie, thinkin' havin' a Nehi and Moon Pie with Opie sounds fun.
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You guys never had the pleasure of cranking up your BG with tastykakes?
<http://www.tastykake.com/
I used to walk trough the woods about a mile for my school bus and would eat my tasty cake on the way and discard the rest. I'd also have my Fox 12 gauge with me incase a crow came by. This was a time when dynamite was used against crow roosts. Things have changed haven't they.
Bill who feeds the birds and calls crows.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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