cornstalks & soybeans

Hey Y'all.
Was wondering if anyone in the group has ever used cornstalks or soybeans in the place of hay. I know there are a few others on here that have livestock. We have decided to bale the cornstalks & soybeans to use as hay. Have heard of others doing this, and a lot of locals will probably be following in our footsteps in this, since we have a severe shortage of hay this year.
How do the cattle & horses take to it? Has anyone had any success with this?
Thanks!
Rae
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On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 14:20:08 -0700, raeannsimpson

Cattlemen I once helped fed baled corn stalks to their cattle in a bad hay year. They suplemented heavily with Range Cubes to make up for the lack of protein and nutrients in the corn stalks.
The cattle weren't very enthused about the baled stalks, but they ate.
http://www.thecattlesite.com/articles/840/cattle-corn-and-alternative-feeds
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/disaster/drought/cornstalksdairyheifer.html
Here is a link from NC from this year...........it is a PDF file. http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/disaster/drought/baling_and_feeding_corn_stalks.pdf
Same article in HTML format http://64.233.169.104/search?q Κche:O3ZPYb1q9y0J:www.ces.ncsu.edu/disaster/drought/baling_and_feeding_corn_stalks.pdf+baled+corn+stalks+as+cattle+feed&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us
Soybean residue is a poorer quality feed than corn stalks and needs supplemention as well.
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/ansci/livestoc/as1182.htm#SOYBEAN%20RESIDUE
SOYBEAN RESIDUE
Soybean stems are very low in feed value, and animals should not be forced to consume them. Most of the nutritive value of soybean stover comes from the pods and leaves. This residue is most efficiently harvested by grazing ruminants.
Cached article on gooble.............
October 18, 2002 Grazing Soybean Stubble Requires Supplementing Protein
LINCOLN, Neb. — Producers putting their cattle out to graze soybean stubble this fall need to be sure their herds are getting enough protein, a University of Nebraska forage specialist said.
Unlike cornstalks, soybean stubble provides little protein to cattle, but it still is a valuable feed resource this fall due to reduced pasture grazing, and tight and expensive hay supplies, said Bruce Anderson, forage specialist for the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
"When most of us think of soybeans, we think high protein, so we expect soybean residues also will be a high protein food," Anderson said. "Unfortunately, the opposite is true because soybean residue often is very low in protein."
Soybean stems and pods contain only about 4 percent to 6 percent crude protein, but dry beef cows need about 7 percent to 8 percent crude protein each day, he said.
"Even though leaves can be up to 12 percent protein, it's only around one-third digestible," he said. "In fact, protein digestibility is low in all bean residues."
Soybean residue is even lower in energy content, Anderson said.
Its total digestible nutrients average between 35 percent to 45 percent for leaves, stems and pods, he said. Unless cows grazing soybean residues also find and eat quite a few beans, they can lose weight and body condition quickly.
"Cattle must be fed quite a bit of higher energy and protein feeds to make up for these deficiencies in soybean residues," Anderson said. "Supplementing soybean stubble with alfalfa hay, corn silage and many byproducts can help form a more complete ration."
One good way to use soybean stubble is as an extender of much higher quality hay or silage, Anderson said.
"Cattle can be fed sufficient hay or silage to meet most of their nutrient needs, then finish filling their intake desire with the soybean stubble," he said.
10/18/02-AF
Bruce Anderson - Ph.D Agronomy Professor
Care and Good Thru the Winter Charlie
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Charlie, I read what you posted here concerning feeding soybeans to cattle. here's what a friend up in Franklin county did last year. he cut soybeans with a hay cutter in september before any foliage began to turn and drop. he let them lay for about 2 days and then raked and round bailed them. transported the bails into his cattle lots then busted and spread the bails. the cows ate it up. he also had hay for them but the cows showed a preference for the soybean. I'm a wake county bean farmer and I could not believe he did it because he had a beautiful crop with a potential of 65 to 70 bushels to the acre and beans came off the combine at $6.05 to $6.30 around here last year. he later told me he was sure he got the $6.05 to $6.30 and some back during the sale of his beef cattle.
I don't really know what your interest might be in bean farming but I'll share my collection of bean farming web page pictures with you just on the chance you might care to have a look see.
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/soybean-field.html
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Howdy neighbor Jim,
Since I was the OP, I eavesdropped on your reply to Charlie....
Glad to hear of the success your friend had while using soybeans as feed. Makes me feel a little better about it. You reckon the beans will pull good at market again? Down here in Sampson, crops don't look too good at all. Enjoyed checking out your page. As a side note/ question, you ever do business with Asgrow? Who was the supplier you tried out on the lime page? I think I recognize the logo on the trucks, but can't make it out too good....
Rae
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raeannsimpson wrote:

doing well and hope you are too.

this is my local point of sale: http://www.baileyfeedmill.com / $8.23 this morning and with the major reduction in bean acreage this year due to farmers going with corn coupled with the new biodiesel facilities coming on line right here in NC and then reduced yields due to this blasted drought I'm feeling like the supports are in place for a good market this fall.

crops up here in Wake, Franklin and Johnston counties are weak. the only real rains this year have been from small spotty thunder storms.

thanks. I enjoy picture taking, it's kind of a hobby.

no.
they are out of Wilson NC but my contact is in Wendell named, Wendell Farm Market. they can be reached at 919-365-6402. the applicator truck is GPS equipped and has always done an excellent job of being able to adjust the application rate while moving over the land as a result of the GPS mapping created from soil samples. GPS on the crop producing farm is good stuff.
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter /
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I know those guys...good people there.

Same here in the rainfall department. Northern parts of the county have gotten more rain than we have here.

just wondering...my grandfather was a dealer up that way after retiring from the ag office. also used to be the greene co ag. ext. agent.

I thought I recognized it. My (bio-)dad works for Wilson County Farm Supply. He does most of the field work...taking the samples, driving the Prowler, etc. I'm originally from Wilson County. Saratoga, to be exact. I didn't move down this way til '98.

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On Aug 31, 9:51 pm, Charlie wrote:

Hey Charlie,
Thanks for the input & links. After we (hubby & I) had started talking about trying the cornstalks & soybeans, the local office of the FSA started releasing news statements for the farmers to try to do so. Claim that the round bales of each could be sold for at least $35.00 or so, and that the soybean farmers would make more profit from the beans by selling them as hay this year since the crops were so damaged from the drought & heat.
We have already started baling the cornstalks, know some locals that want to have their soybeans baled so they don't lose their cattle. Stockyard business is booming with cattlemen taking their cattle to the market early this year, to keep from having to over-winter them with the lack of hay. This year, cattlemen & hay farmers alike will be taking a big punch in the stomach when it comes to profits. Have to do something to stay afloat. Especially us little guys...so I'm trying to do as much research as I can on this.
Still doing the google thing....UGH!
Rae
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