Coffee Plants

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I just picked up a pot of coffee plants from Wal-Mart yesterday, they were sitting in a plastic container 1/3 full with water. I took them out to let the roots dry out and am going to replant each one in it's own pot, there's 6. I'm not too familiar with growing them as a house plant, any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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Is this like the coffee plants you bought? http://gurneys.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_11295
I want to get some myself. 7 years in Seattle turned me into a caffiene junkie. And hopefully sometime this year I'll be moving back if everything I plan stops going to hell, but oh well...anyways, I sure hope someone has experience with them, I always prefer growing my own if possible.
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Not likely that you will be able to grow coffee in Seattle and harvest beans for your own brew.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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<<Not likely that you will be able to grow coffee in Seattle and harvest beans for your own brew.
-- Travis in Shoreline Washington>>
Not even in a greenhouse? Oh well. I just reminded myself in the dandelion post that the roots make a good coffee substitute(I've actually tried it), and I know those can grow pretty much anywhere in the continental US. :-)
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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 22:19:32 +0000, Lilah Morgan wrote:

I'm just growing them because I can, not to try and make my own coffee, although that would be cool.
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Chickory root is supposed to be a good coffee substitute but I've never tried it.
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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 23:39:22 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

Not a substitute, an additive to make coffee go longer. After our first time in New Orleans many years ago, we now exclusively drink Cafe du Monde ground coffee with chickory. Talk about your thick coffee! It tastes like it is much stronger than it actually is. I've been looking all over for expresso to no avail. Maybe my mom can mail us some from New York. Down here in the hinterlands they don't sell expresso in the grocery.
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From THE NEW AGE HERBALIST: "Roast chickory root can be drunk as a coffee substitute..."
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FragileWarrior wrote:

It is one of those myths that gets repeated in every book ad nausiam.
Like second cuttings of rhubard are poisionous or horseradish harvested in Spring will kill you.
But try it, you might like it... but I doubt it.
js
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What is?

From WEEDS IN MY GARDEN:
"...When I was in New Orleans some years ago I found the beverage made from [chickory root] to my liking, particularly as a change from ordinary coffee. I have since learned that one brand of coffee with chicory as well as pure chicory may be purchased locally. It makes an extremely dark brew."
http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1743,153187-253205,00.html DANDELION AND - OR CHICKORY "COFFEE"     Dig the roots. Scrub them thoroughly. Roast in slow (300 degree) oven until brown all the way through...several hours. Grind. Brew into "coffee" type drink just as you would brew true coffee.
http://coffeetea.about.com/cs/coffeesubstitutes/a/chicory.htm "... Many coffee producers offer blends with up to 30% chicory, which cuts down on the caffeine content of your cup. But many folk enjoy a cup of 'coffee' made entirely from ground, roasted chicory."
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Chicory is normally used as an extender when processed with ground coffee. I got many more google hits with the proper spelling myself as well. http://www.google.com/search?as_q=&hl=en&num &btnG=Google+Search&as_epq=chicory&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&as_rights=&safe=images
--
Dave

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Yes, yes, no one is debating that. They've been doing that as long as there has been coffee, I think. The quote above mentions a 30% ratio chicory:coffee. But it is also used to make a pure chicory coffee, too, which I have been told was wrong and a myth. Apparently I wasn't wrong nor is it a myth. In fact, there are many posts out there by people who have had the coffee. Under either/both/all spellings.
[..]
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And one more chicory coffee review that has a funny ending:
Guide Review - Roasted Chicory Chicory is a natural and decaffeinated alternative to coffee that many people say tastes 'the same'. I am going to put that to the test.
When roasted and ground, is it undistinguishable from roasted and ground coffee. Looks the same, thought it doesn't smell the same. It has a roasted aroma, but is also quite sweet smelling with almost a hint of chocolate.
It brews up pretty much like regular coffee, though I found the resulting beverage a little 'thicker' than coffee. Not really thick, but it had a bit more body to it than regular coffee. Given the sweet smell of the chicory grounds, I was completely shocked by the taste. Sour. I think it was the most sour thing I've had in a mug. Healthy or not, it was just nasty. I couldn't finish it.
My wife had a cup before I had a chance to tell her that it was actually chiorcy. She didn't even notice. Granted, I suspect she gave her cup a good dose of vanilla creamer and brown sugar, which would mask the taste of just about anything. I no longer trust her judgement.
http://coffeetea.about.com/od/coffeesubstitutes/gr/chicory.htm
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 11:37:38 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

In the Internet, it must be so. In a magazine, must be so. Go buy some and use it as coffee. Get back when you do.
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wrote:

I've listed herb books as well as sources from the internet. I've given you the tools you need to go look at the sources yourself and read articles written by people who have tried the coffee for themselves. What more can I do to support a point I made?
I never said chicory coffee was good; I said that coffee can be made from chicory. Please try to read for comprehension instead of immediately flying off the handle and attacking an opinion or viewpoint that differs from your's.
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Everyone else knows that chicory is found as either a coffee extender, coffee substitue with other additives or as a stand alone drink. Why bother with one person who doesn't appear to have ever looked at the products on the shelves of a health food shop or even at the range of products available in the beverages aisle of a supermarket?
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wrote:

You have a point. I did think the "in the internet, it must be so" point was rather amusing, though, considering where we all are. :)
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wrote:

Foods. Chickory is ten dollars a pound there.
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 12:50:52 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

You keep calling it chickory coffee. It is NOT coffee. It is chickory drink or tea or whatever it is. It completely changes the texture and taste of ordinary roasted coffee, so it is not as close to the taste of coffee you insist it is.
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wrote:

Please cite where I said it was "close to the taste of coffee".
You REALLY need to work on your comprehension skills.
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