Clethra delavayi, Viburnum x carlcephalum & Dipelta floribunda

Hi, Can anyone with actual growing experience provide some basic location info for planting the above? Have zone info. Have new potplant but wish to know if require mulching for moisture prevention, wind/sun info, growth (height each year after initial 18 month settling). My soil is 5.5pH - 7pH. Heavy but nutritious, drainage is quite good, though at this time of year everything is wet -- Regards Mike Gilmore WinsfordWalledGarden, SW England, USDA Zone9a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike! How goes the astounding garden?
Viburnum x carlcephalum grows 6 to 10' high with an equal spread. Habit is somewhat open and loose (so says Dirr, may experiences are it can get to 12' over time, and tighter in full sun.) Again Dirr recommends and I wholeheartedly agree that Viburnum x carlcephalum 'Cayuga' is a great cultivar alternative to this somewhat lumpy shrub. Regardless, it's tolerant of widely varying pH but would appreciate MAWD-- moist, acidic, well-drained soil and partial to full sun. If you get really baked in full sun then high shade or dappled sunshine would be best, else the leaves will wilt and the shrub will generally have a bedraggled look.The flower buds are distinctly pink but open pure white.
I note you say you're in 9a-- all the books I've read indicate Viburnum x carlcephalum is only good as warm as Zone 8...
Dave
message

drainage
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

to make it as informative and interesting as I possibly can. I made the enquiry in the first place because in my humble experience many plant labels over here often underestimate the eventual size of plants for the benefit of the inexperienced with modest suburban gardens. Thanks for the info on the Viburnum
Zone 9a is correct as we have the benefit of the gulf stream across the Atlantic. However, because of our westerly location we also suffer wind and rain. Both of which affect tempertures but our modest ultimate lows (around -3C for shortperiods) keep us in the high zone.E.g. Currently I have a honeysuckle, a Tree poppy in flowertogether with penstemons and alstroemerias from my window as I type this -- granted not Florida but not Minnesota either. Regards Mike Gilmore WinsfordWalledGarden, SW England, USDA Zone9a

info
for
initial
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dave, IME, upper hardiness "limits" are not very meaningful. While they may definitely have some bearing in those zones that get very hot summers with high humidity, in more temperate zones, they just don't seem to apply. For example I grow all manner of plants which are listed upto zone 7 and I am in zone 8 (soon to be bumped up to 9). But then, high summer temps with high humidity are not a concern here.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wish I had your climate! Upper limits are easily reached here with such trees as white birch, sugar maples, and Tamaracks... they just hate our warm nights.
Dave

x
may
in
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.