Burr Oaks

My sister has sent what she calls burr oak acorns. I want to plant them. Should acorns have the cute little caps removed before planting? Should they be scored? soaked? What? Thanks, Jackie, zone 7
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On Mon, 5 May 2008 19:40:05 -0400, "Jacqueline Davidson"

The acorn should be fully dried and brown and the whole of it is planted. In nature, squirrels and crows do this. I have a bur oak, and several climax live oaks which produce acorns and I also have tiny trees coming up everywhere on the property. I dig them out and give them away to friends. It can take a year for the acorn to sprout the seed inside of it.
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Something interesting about acorns: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/unique_parts/oak_nr-acorns.html
and
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/unique_parts/oak_white_files/oak_white-acorns.html
Bur oak is close to white oak. Do the acorns mature on current growth or on last years growth of bur oak?
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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for a tree expert you certainly ask pretty basic questions... bur oak acorns take 2 years to mature, so they obviously mature on last years growth.
lee
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I do not have all the answers. So in that respect a bur oak is similar to a red oak. Very interesting. I learn something new everyday. I believe the vessel arrangement is similar to white oak with tyloses plugging all but the current growth increment. Can you verify that Lee?
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i believe so. it's been awhile since i read up on the oak family, but i think they all form tyloses. the burr oak is a pretty interesting tree. i have a few on my NY property, but they don't grow at all in my area of NH. lee
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The white oaks have conducting and non-conducting sapwood. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/S/sapwood.html
The current growth increment is the only one that is not plugged with tyloses. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/HTMLFILES/plugging%20of%20vessels.html
All other sapwood increments are plugged. Oaks are heartwood forming trees. The red oak has all conducting sapwood and forms traumatic tyloses when wounded. You could take a cookie of each and spit on it and blow through. The red oak will bubble all increments of sapwood unless wounded. The white oak will only show bubbles in the current growth increment. You can look these things up in the dictionary. I will go back and add some links for you.
John

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I just blew some leaves away from an area and many acorns were growing in leaves. They are not in the soil but in the duff. Maybe planting acorns down in the soil is too deep.
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/HTMLFILES/acorns_duff.html
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On Tue, 6 May 2008 21:37:31 -0400, "symplastless"

Better not tell the bur oak, live oak, and red oaks because the crows bury the acorns about two inches down in the soil. I have plants all over coming up. Not to say the acorns in the litter wont germinate, but usually their fate is limited to the litter layer in that case.
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wrote:

right, the ones that germinate in the duff, or aren't buried tend to dry out & die before the root gets established. not always, because there are always exceptions, but most of the time. i have the same problems germinating my American chestnuts. i was not burying them far enough down... lee
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On 5/5/2008 4:40 PM, Jacqueline Davidson wrote:

I've sprouted acorns of white oaks. One of the "sprouts" is now a tree much taller than my two-story house, about 20 inches in diameter at chest height (the height at which tree girth if often measured), with a branch spread of 45 feet or more. It's 31 years old.
Acorns from that tree are now trees planted in a nearby park. See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_oak_acorn.html .
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