Aussie tree cuttings

Hello. I live on a ranch in an area of northern Idaho mountains and we get winters with heavy snow and temperature that can drop to the MINUS teens. I think we are zone 4.
My question concerns some cuttings I've rooted just this May from an Aussie tree which is a hybrid willow. I am sure you've seen them advertised on the web. We have one actively growing tree and want to add several more as a screen. I have 16 of them rooted and growing well in 1 and 1.5 quart containers. I think they are too young to plant this fall as we have wild grasses in the area to be planted, rocky, clay soil on a sloping bank along a road. How can I best winter these young trees over and when would be best to plant them next year? Spring or fall? I have an unheated greenhouse that is a shack at best. I do have an insulated out building without windows.
Thanks for any advice, Deb
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Good question. In a tree biology workshop it once came up about planting time. It was said that diffuse porous wood trees in the spring. The trees with the more robust root system, the ring porous trees in the fall. Conifers could be planted in the winter if you can work the soil. It was made very clear that these were merrily suggestions and not rules in any way. Willow would be a diffuse porous tree. I do not have the answer for the rest of your question.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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Thanks for this rule info. I had never heard those terms and looked them up to understand more about the concept. This helps a lot as far as planting some other trees I have started from seed - maples, oaks, and some fir & pines. They have done very well planted in fall, which makes sense since I'd think they are in the ring porous category. I will plant my Aussie willows in the spring, then. Deb
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I have to comment again that I have been continuing to look for more info on this subject. Seems like everytime I click on a link that looks like it has an informative article, you have written it! I see I was mistaken in thinking maples are of the ring porous type. This is so complicated and I hope you'll help me understand. In this article http://ccil.org/~treeman/tree3.html you indicated oaks ( and I have pin oaks started from acorns) are ring porous. Watering is a big problem because of where these trees, now 4 to 6 feet tall. I think I understand that they absorb water early in the spring and then are fine for a period of time without water. Is that right? And is that as opposed to maples which need more water, frequently, because they are diffuse porous. Am I understanding correctly? Deb
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