apple pear or

nashi pear or korean pear or asian pear or... the pear is known by many names. its home is in asia. its fruit is most delicious. has anyone tried raising one?
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Meaning What;942204 Wrote: > nashi pear or korean pear or asian pear or... the pear is known by many > names. its home is in asia. its fruit is most delicious. has anyone > tried raising one?
Yes. But it doesn't do terribly well in my rather dry garden in SE England.
--
echinosum


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echinosum schrieb:

does it take until it bears fruit for the first time?
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On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 19:22:08 +0100, Meaning What

Nashi calender: http://www.metro.co.uk/news/pictures/photos-10865/nashi-anti-corruption-calendar-2011/1
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Brooklyn1 schrieb:

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/pictures/photos-10865/nashi-anti-corruption-calendar-2011/1 i like. i wouldnt mind having all twelve of them in my garden.
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Meaning What;942341 Wrote: > echinosum schrieb:-

> many

> how long

(I prefer to buy maidens bare-rooted, but this was all I could find after 2 years of looking). The variety is Shinseiki, which is partially self fertile, and produces the smooth pale yellow fruits I prefer (rather than the more rough russet kind). I have a couple of normal pears nearby, which apparently are sufficient to cross-pollinate, though not every year do the other ones flower early enough to be effective. Because the Asians are early flowerers - early April, sometimes even late March - some years a late frost has destroyed most of the developing fruit. Also I lost most of the flower buds to the harsh winters of the last two years - maybe that is a feature of SE Englands on-again-off-again winters.
It actually gave me a few fruits first year, just to taste, and then a few more 2nd year and quite a lot 3rd and 4th years. It grew quite vigorously during this period, such that I was pruning it. But in general all of these fruits are plum-sized rather than the apple-sized fruits one sees in the shops. It then suddenly stopped being vigorous, and now hardly puts on any new wood, and yields are now much lower. Probably I ought to clear a bare earth circle round it, fertilise it, and water it a lot. Maybe a bit of pruning, even though it is old wood, might help reinvigorate it, though it only flowers on old wood.
--
echinosum


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I have 3, 2 Hosui (OHF 333 rootstock) which are the best tasting and one other, forget the name but need cross pollination for best crop. the one isnt that good tasting I poach in a sugar syrup with pear brandy. On dwarf rootstock they try to set fruit the first year. I dont let them. The two year old had 5-6, the big older one suffered some die back (it is in a 150 gallon rubbermaid) but it is hanging on. http://weloveteaching.com/landscape/orchard/orchard.html
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Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago
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