Another roto-tiller question (wheel usage)

Hi, this should be my last roto-tiller question for the time being. :)
My front tine roto-tiller has wheels (behind the front tines), and it also has a hinged stake thingy behind the wheels. The wheels have a mechanism which allows them to easily be removed as an assembly.
When you roto-till, do you take the wheels off of yours and use the hinged stake thingy for rear support? Or do you leave the wheels on and use the stake at the same time?
Thanks for any help with this,
Jon
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 13:36:54 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

Could the hinged stake thingy be the plow? If so, that comes off when tilling but back on when you lay out your rows. I'm no expert, but I'm pretty sure the wheels stay on. They did when I was tilling.
Kate
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Thanks Kate, I appreciate it.
Jon
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 13:36:54 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

The wheels stay on as well as the stake thingie. Depth control and tiller control.
The stake thingie is also used to keep the tiller from dragging you around and makes it so you don't have to backfight the thing so much. Set it at a depth that allows your tiller to work itself forward slowly.
Personally, I have given up on rototilling. It breaks my heart to see worm hamburger. Try googling lasagna gardening to see what I mean.
--
Care
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote:

Ah, that makes sense; thanks Charlie.
Jon
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"Jon Danniken" wrote:

What brand tiller? Don't you have the owner's manual... you can probably download a copy.
That stake thingie is a depth regulator adjustor, a stop of sorts, not meant for accuracy but for approximate... it is not a support like a kickstand. For deeper tilling adjust the arm higher, for shallower tilling adjust the arm lower. Do NOT run unit with wheels removed.
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 13:36:54 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

I hope you have a manual for your tiller. The wheels are only to make it easy to get your machine from storage to/from the work site. The stake is usually adjustable and allows deep or shallow tilling. Take extra care about not losing the locking pin, maybe paint it red.
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wrote:

Actually those are drive wheels and free wheelers... engaged/disengaged by a device at each hub. You do not want to forget to engage those wheels before starting up the engine and engaging the tiller.

The stake is always adjustable, otherwise it would be useless.

First few times you pull/push the pin through the hole the paint will be gone. It's much better to attach the pin to the machine with a cable lanyard... drill a small hole through the end of the pin and attach a split ring... otherwise when the pin falls out you'll never know until later and you won't find it in freshly tilled earth no matter what color. Usually there is already a split ring with that pin but it still needs to be fastened to the machine with a cable lanyard.
Tillers don't have a kill device like a push mower, the tines will stop but the tiller motor will still run when you walk away... don't ever take your hand off the steering handle with the motor running and never attempt any adjustments/repairs with the motor running unless the tine assembly is first removed... the tine engagement lever is small and easily bumped. Some idiots attempt to hose off the machine while the motor is running, a great way to lose body parts. Whenever putting the tiller in reverse never stand directly behind the machine.
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 23:40:36 GMT, "brooklyn1"

Have you actually seen the OP's tiller? Not everyone has the same tiller as you.

Wrong. Careful of your use of "always" unless you have seen every tiller.

Wrong again. Paint the head of the pin.

Sorry brooklyn, but there are a lot of different kinds of tillers. Where have you been?
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 13:36:54 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

Jon, I found it easier to remove the wheels and control the front tine tiller I had with just rotating tines and the stake. I think the wheels might be nice if you needed to move the tiller across a driveway, patio or surface you don't want marked with tines. I didn't need wheels to move it to prevent digging/marking up the pathway I took to the garden, simply lifted the weight off the stake and walked it on the tines to the place I wanted to start and dug in the stake to hold the machine back as it began to dig. As I wanted to move forward I lifted the stake to allow the tines to move the machine forward. Experience in using the front tine, or "jumping jack" tiller makes it easier.
--
Hal Middle Georgia, Zone 8
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I've had two: a Mantis, and a Honda I got when the Mantis quit after a couple of years.
Each of them had an arm behind the tines, and you could attach wheels to the arm for transporting it (they were actually light enough to just pick up), or attach an adjustable stake. The instruction manuals said to take the wheels off when cultivating, and use the stake to control the depth. Both worked well that way, although the Mantis didn't last due to engine problems.
I find it hard to visualize how one would work with the wheels on and the control stake behind them; it would appear that the wheels would prevent the tines from digging in. But as some posters have said, there are many brands out there and it would be best to find an operating manual to insure safe operation.
Jon Danniken wrote:

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