Will leaves falling in my mulch be a problem?

We have lots of perennial flowers in our flower bed. (12 different varieties or so- including bushes and roses, 15'x6' aprox garden) My wife was thinking of putting mulch between the flowers so the weeds would not grow (easier maintenance). I was not sure if that would be a good idea for two reasons. 1. when the leave accumulate in the fall time in our flower bed, it will be difficult to get rid of them (hard to get a rake in there). With dirt flower bet, what ever you can't rake out, it will decompose with the rest of the dirt. And if you leave them in with the mulch, seeds will start growing there next year. 2. will perennial flowers be able to poke through the mulch every spring time? I always thought that mulch is more ideal it you have a simple flower bed or around a tree truck. what do yo think? thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
Leaves rot down to make an excellent mulch. Leaf mould we call it in UK. Don't worry about the perennials, they'll be back. If You're really worried about the leaves, grab big handfuls where you can and bag them up to rot down and go back on the garden later. They can also be sucked up through a leaf blower/shredder whatever. Some people pile them up and mow the pile. Some people push them en masse under bushes/shrubs and forget about them. Whichever method you choose, they will be good stuff.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
how long does it take for them to become mulch? I am thinking of using my maple and ash leaves from last fall as a weed deterrent in my veggie garden this year by spreading them around the areas I don't want weeds to grow (I usually use newspaper). Would this be a good idea? Will the leaves 'rot' properly if I use them this way?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are mulch as soon as you apply them as mulch, or as "a" mulch if you prefer. Some people use a layer of grit/gravel/slate chippings etc as a mulch around container plants for instance. It means a protective or barrier layer.

I
idea?
Oh yes indeed. Last fall would have been better, but what I would do now is dig them in and let the worms do their stuff. Or you can use them as a mulch round the base of plants as a weed deterrent and to help to avoid drying out.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JewelOfTheGnarf) wrote in message

yes, usually leaves are gone by the next growing season in Michigan. In fact, when I plan to use the bed for plants two years running I mulch with wood chips. If I want to use it for direct seeding the year after I use leaves or cardboard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
btw: I want to use red wood much.

a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wife
idea
our
in
around
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leaf litter is an excellent soil amendment.
lbbs wrote:

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 13:47:38 -0400, lbbs wrote:

Perennials and bulbs will grow right up through mulch no problem. As for the leaves you can *gently* rake most of them out, the remaining will do no harm but will actually do more good. Rotted leaves are a great soil amendment. I mulch up and dig in some in my flower beds every fall. By spring they are just about all rotted and composted.
Most importantly, HAVE FUN out there!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.