What kind of tree is this (link)? Is this fruit edible?

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The leaves are alternatve. Also, yes, some of the fruits can be VERY milky. A few seem more dry, particularly the bigger ones.
Here are some pictures of the inside one of the larger ones:
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x108/Bouje22/P1011090.jpg
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x108/Bouje22/P1011091.jpg
Thanks
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Zarlot531 wrote:

Do you have a picture of the flowers? The fruit looks somewhat like a pygmy pawpaw (Asimina pygmea), and you are in the right area for pygmy pawpaws, but the leaves aren't right. The pawpaw flowers however, are distinctive.
-Philip
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Zarlot531 wrote:

Not pear for sure, so forget what I posted!
Tom J
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That fruit almost loooks like mangosteen.
You can peruse the California Rare Fruit Growers web site. http://www.crfg.org/index.html #
Send them Email: snipped-for-privacy@crfg.org
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http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x108/Bouje22/P1011090.jpghttp://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x108/Bouje22/P1011091.jpg
That fruit almost loooks like mangosteen.
Not like any mangosteen I've eaten.
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On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 09:30:46 -0700, Zarlot531 wrote:

Well, the inside doesn't look like a fig.
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On 7/9/2008 8:59 PM, Zarlot531 wrote:

It's definitely a camellia, most likely C. japonica although it might be C. sasanqua. Even the blurred photo resembles a camellia bush. The fruit is not likely edible, but it is also not likely toxic.
Usually the flowers fall off without forming any fruit. If you allow the fruit to mature, the ripened seeds can be planted and might produce a new variety of camellia.
Young leaves of the closely related C. sinensis are the primary ingredient of commercial tea.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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In article

Not a pear as the leaves are too tough and waxy. Not likely a camellia or you'd've noticed big flowers and the occasional fruit would look more like an apple. Tempting to suggest the somewhat exotic Java Apple (Szyzygium samarangense) or some other species of Szyzygium. If that's it, the fruit are edible, taste like pear, but is much less dense than a pear when ripe, more like melon in texture.
-paghat the ratgirl
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["Followup-To:" header set to rec.gardens.]

Offhand, looks like a quince to me, Cydonia oblonga. One of the better local nurseries could ID it for you with little trouble, most likely -- I never like doing ids completely from photos. If it is quince, it has edible fruit, though they need to be cooked first.
Kay
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This thread may have gone on long enough, but I do agree with David and Monique -- almost certainly Camellia, and most likely C. japonica (the leaves look too broad to be C. sasanqua to me). And in Columbia SC, the climate is right.
Zarlot531 wrote:

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Leaf is wrong, waxy smooth on the subject, dull on the Camellia.
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D. Staples wrote:

Camellia japonica leaves are extremely shiny. Always. Exactly like these.
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I'm also sure it's a camellia.
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Finale answer, yeah, camellia.
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On 7/10/2008 6:53 PM, D. Staples wrote:

My camellias -- both C. japonica and C. sasanqua -- have dark green leaves that are quite shiny on top. When I spray, I must add liquid soap to the mix. Otherwise, the spray beads up as if the leaves were coated in wax. I see the same effect when the sprinklers run.
Further, , my camellia leaves appear on the stems alternately and are serrated as in the photos. Finally, the leaf peteols (stems) and the woody branches on my camellias look just like those in the photo for P1011086.jpg.
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Climate: California Mediterranean
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On 7/11/2008 4:26 PM, David E. Ross wrote:

Just this week, I picked a "fruit" from one of my C. sasanqua that looks just like the photo.
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Looks like a ficus/fig of some type.
Simon

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Leaves are similar to those of the Avocado (pear). Could the fruit be a discoloured Avocado?
Peter

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On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 20:59:12 -0700, Zarlot531 wrote:

It looks like a type of ficus. Not all figs have the classic "fig leaf" type of leaf.
Cut open the fruit and give us another pic.
sf
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[snipped all responded to previously]
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

Hmmm. Considering mangosteen trees only grow near the equator and are quite temperature sensitive, it likely is not. I've heard that someone got one to grow in southern California in a greenhouse for a couple of years but definitely not to the point of fruiting.
Also, I doubt anyone would describe the fruit as being "milky." It is segmented like a tangerine with a very thick and hard purplish "peel" similar to a pomegranate. The fruit is incredibly delicious; the outside is more bitter than alum.
If you have a growing mangosteen tree, I know some people who would absolutely love to talk with you!
Unfortunately, the photo was not there for me to view, said it was moved or deleted.
Glenna
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