Volunteer Flower I.D.

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This flower has volunteered here since forever, but does anybody know its name?
http://tinypic.com/1r509n5u Top row, middle two pics.
Thanks,
--

- Billy

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In article

The softness of the stems intrigued me.
BIll
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

"Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
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I added a third to show the flowers in place. So now it is the top row, except for the borage and the onion.
--

- Billy

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The magenta flower is Lychnis - it also comes in white. They are brilliant survivors in dry conditions which they seem to prefer and in my place the volunteer seeds sprout in a gravel pathway.
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In article

Indeed that is it, thank you Fran. It is odd, and reassurring that, though thousands of miles apart, we have the same floral friends. The Lychnis coronaria, the red Valerian, Nasturtiums, and the Foxglove are volunteer guests every year here, on the north side of the hill. They seem to grow wherever I don't intrude.
Oh, Happy Winter Solstice, the lengthening days will push you to start collecting your seeds. You must have about 60 days before you need to start germinating. Time to make plans.
And thanks again.
--

- Billy

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It is indeed nice and glad to be of some help. It's very, very irritating to not know what a certain plant is. I have one in my front driveway and it's a glorious thing in spring. It took me 10 years to find out that it is a Parahebe, but beyond that, I still have no idea of its full name and I can find nothing on the Net quite like it.
The

I love common old Valerian and also Foxgloves but they don't do well here as they prefer moister conditions than they can regularly get.
My really super duper favourites of the old fashioned plants though would have to be Lily of the Valley, Lavendar Shower and Fairy Fishing Rod. I can't grow Lavender Shower here but I can on our other farm where I've tucked it inot the hsade behind a water tank on the eastern side of the house and even though we are not there a great deal, without any help on my part it thrives. I've done much the same thing with the Lily of the Valley - south facing and moist and always in shade and it keeps on keeping on.

Thank you for the Winter wishes - it's as cold as charity here ATM.
As you lot write about your tomatoes and lovely summer crops, I go a bright pea green colour. But David and I will get our turn soon and then we'll make you Northern Hemisphere types turn pea green :-))

Most welcome.
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FarmI wrote:

This makes me wonder how much moisture Valerian must take. My brother, who lives on the edge of a valley (Cleveland, Ohio), has a substantial stand of Lily of the Valley in the swampiest part of the yard. I've never seen them grow elsewhere. The only thing I've seen grow in swampier (and shady) conditions is skunk cabbage.
I was always fond of jack in the pulpit, which grew in the valley. Never a lot but always a few.
Jeff
Lavendar Shower and Fairy Fishing Rod. I

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It thrives on neglect and doesn't need watering.
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- Billy

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wrote:

Not true. It dies here in TN unless heavily watered. It's no heat lover either.

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Then you have a different flower. My come up out of uncultivated clay and lives lone enough to seed for the following year. I have taken to watering mine when I think of it, because they are free beauty, along with the red valerians, fox gloves, and the nasturtiums, but they endured a decade of neglect, when we first moved into this house.
--

- Billy

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In article <wildbilly-253140.17293324062009@c-61-68-245-

From the Valerian we planted a few years ago, only two plants of eight survived neglect. (Valeriana officinalis Anthos) Valerian and our variety are listed as hardy from zone 4 to 9.
And it might be our variety, but in the riot of plants we have growing, they don't seed at all.
Zone 5... sandy soil.
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I have no idea how they do it. I had two empty pots from the basil the year before, and the red valerian moved in. It never comes up in cultivated soil for me. See Garden: http://tinypic.com/1r509n5u
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In article <wildbilly-25C53E.22022824062009@c-61-68-245-

Red Valerian (centranthus ruber)is also known as Jupiter's beard and is a wasteland plant.
Valeriana Officinalis is related but not a close cousin.
The former is (IIRC) edible. The latter, sedative.
We had valerian (officinalis) with red, white and orange flowers. The reds survived.
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--

- Billy

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In article <wildbilly-3CBEC7.08272725062009@c-61-68-245-

LOL ...just checked the Richter's seed catalogue and it's described as culinary.
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See: <http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Centranthus+ruber
--

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wrote:

Ah yes, I use valerian nearly daily.
Eau de DirtySocks! ;-)
Marvelous herb. Valerian...strong!!
Charlie
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-officinalis- so as not to confooz the casual peroozer of the thread.
What for?

Aint that the truth.
Essence de pile of a year's worth of dirty socks while drying.
My wife, who'd never experienced the charm of valerian's earthy fragrance, was a study in revulsion...

I agree though our cat does not.
She thinks ditchwater is more interesting.
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wrote:

Interesting. Many cats enjoy as much as catnip, with similar effects. I've known such cats and am now careful with my valerian.
Kate

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wrote:

Quite right. I often forget about the necessity to be more precise.

For it's sedative and muscle relaxing effect. It's in the herbal powder mix I make for my bood pressure and heart.
I also use it for sleep, as I often have difficulty going to and remaining asleep. It is good for turning off radio station KRZY that ups it's power output at bedtime. I usually use a standardized extract for sleeping. Works wonderfully....most of the time.

Mine also. I so enjoy opening a container of valerian and then waiting for her to pick up on it's fragrance. Works every time!

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