Tomatoes not setting fruit

I'm in Columbia SC and planted late (early June) in a new garden plot w very rich soil. I also added Miracle grow tomatoe fertilizer not realizing I was probably over fertilizing. I now have a Mortgage Lifter that is over 6 feet high but few blossoms and a Marion that is smaller but also barren. A few blossoms but only one tomatoe so far. Can I do anything? Will these plants likely bear fruit once it cools down some (some days are below 90 but not for long usually).
--Don
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I don't think so.

Yes, but over 90 is just too hot. Temps need to be below that and below 70 F at night for fruit to set. Sometimes you can help pollination along with a paintbrush or even a good shaking when the temps are too high. If you have some blossoms, that might be worth a shot.
marcella
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He could try flooding their feet every day to leach the excess N out of the soil, but at some point, he'd start depriving the plants of the oxygen they need in the soil. (Waterlog the roots.)
And what you said about high temps, I know it's true, although we don't have that problem locally.
All of my 'maters are in a hothouse. I shake each plant every day to ensure pollination, in case a few bees forget to visit. I have really reliable fruit set. (The paintbrush is for people with more time than I have to spend on the 'mater plants.)
Jan in Alaska
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Depending on the size of the plot, you can build a shade or arbor over it to reduce the direct heat and sun on the plants. By doing this you create a cold spot for them. The shade will cool the soil and the indirect sunlight will help reduce the strian on the plants.
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As an addition the my last post. Youi can also creat the same effect by planting the tomatoes between a double row of corn on either side. The corn also works great for other cool weather crops like peas, beans, lettuce ect.
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Too much nitrogen being the first thing to think of, but you probably already realize that with your comment about overfertilizing.
Also, do they get full sun?

If the heat is the problem, I think so. Tomatoes should keep bearing all season, although they can taper off later in the season.
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is exposed to full or almost sun at least half the day. The garage wall shields the plants from the sun the second half of the day. If the soil is the problem, can't I send a sample to some state service and get it analyzed. Let's say I learn there is "too much" nitrogen in the soil; what then is the solution before I plant?
Meanwhile, I'll wait and see if they don't start setting fruit and bearing tomatoes later in the season.
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If you do find out that the soil is nutrient rich, just wait until it leaches out or plant a heavy feeder crop like corn in it. Also you can try to add a mulch to the soil that will eat up the nitrogen during decomposition, like fresh pine or hard wood sawdust or chips.
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