Tomato greenback problem

My tomatoes have cropped really well this year and have generaly ripene
nicely but have suffered a bit from greenback, which has also affecte the flesh inside the fruits. This has resulted in areas of green rathe inedible bits around the stalk area, which have to be cut out befor eating.
I am wondering what might have caused this, what I can do in future t avoid it?
Thank
-- GardenCadet
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GardenCadet said:

My own experience is that green shoulders and large green cores are common in some varieties and very rarely occur in others. In a large oxheart, it's no big deal to cut away the top and cores because you still have a lot of tomato left. In a small variety this can cost you most of your fruit. Some catalogs will admit that a particular variety is prone to green shoulders, and heirloom varieties are more likely to have this problem than modern hybrids.
Here goes with some other explanations (though I firmly believe that varietal traits are the most important factor causing green shoulders).
Various sources say that green shoulders are cause by high temperatures and sun exposure.
According _Identifying Diseases of Vegetables_ by Penn. State Dept. of Agriculture "blotchy ripening" is "promoted by low light intensity (a condition prevalent among dense vines), low temperature levels, excessive soil mousture, excessive soil compaction, high nitrogen levels, and low potassium levels."
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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Pat Kiewicz Wrote:

Thanks for the info. We have had a very hot dry summer in parts of th UK this year. The plants with the worst greenback are growing in pot in full sun outdoors, but were well fed and watered. This seems to fi with the High temperatures and sun exposure theory. I have also grow some in a small greenhouse which was shaded, The fruits of these ha green shoulders inside but ripened evenly outside, so maybe this wa down to the lower light levels.
Since temperaratures have been cooler and light levels less intens ripening on all plants has been better, though hard green areas insid the fruits have remained, ence the request for advice
-- GardenCadet
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