Soy Beans

Anhone know how to make soy milk? They grow a lot of soy beans around here and I thought I might try to make some.
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Try http://tinyurl.com/my5d for the machine-free version. There is a soy milk making machine out there, too, if you want the less hassle version. For example, http://www.anekant.org/soy_milk_machine.htm . Pricey, but if you buy a lot of soy milk, it might be worth it.
You could also wander over to alt.food.asian and PING Nona Myers. She makes her own tofu, okara, and I think soy milk, too. She has posted about her experiences before (mostly on alt.food.asian, but possibly on rec.food.cooking, as well), if you want to do a google groups search.
rona
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 21:51:46 -0400, tippy1

Yes, I know how - I've made soy milk as a step in making tofu.
It's rather a lot of work, unless you use a 'soy milk maker' - this is a machine that does it all for you.
See http://www.ellenskitchen.com/faqs/tofumilk.html#oldsoy for directions on how to make soy milk.
See http://www.soymilkmaker.com/ for info on a soy milk maker. There are other brands too.
Pat
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Fresh soymilk is very good and fresh tofu is outstanding, but believe it, after the first time you will be sickened by the amount of work and mess in your kitchen. Unless you buy some specific tools for the purpose.
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On 14 Sep 2003 12:06:46 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (simy1) wrote:

...and as with corn (maize) thre are quite a number of varieties intended for different purposes. If you have the soybean equivalent of feed corn, it may not turn into a very satisfying milk or tofu.
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 02:46:30 GMT, B.Server

In this connection, although I don't have personal experience with them, I have read that 'Laura' soybeans are excellent for soymilk or tofu. They are commercially available, and (I think) may be found by Googling on 'Laura + soybean'.
Back in the days when I was making tofu, I just bought ordinary soybeans at a natural foods store. The tofu was very good.
Pat
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wrote:

Could be. A quick scan of some seed suppliers might turn up those varieties intended for particular purposes. (Stokes or Thompson & Morgan are examples) My interpretation of the OPs post was that he lived in the midst of a producing area and thought it would supply very inexpensive ingredients.
There was a post a while back about edamame that eventually brought forth three "catagories" of soybean. My recollection was green, yellow, and black. They were used for eating the beans, soy products such as tofu and oil and feed as I recall.
One suspects the "ordinary" soybeans at a grocery store would have been selected by the grocer for the purpose.
Unfortunately, I can't seem to get a crop in either of our two Central Texas growing seasons. They seem extraordinarily susceptable to spider mites and late season heat.
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