Seedless Grape Propagation

I've rooted some cuttings from my Concord Seedless grape vines. I'm new to grape gardening, and would like to know if these cuttings will produce seedless concord grapes?
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On 17 Sep 2003 08:41:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Greg) wrote:

They certainly should. They should be genetically identical to the parent plant. Different environmental conditions could change the resulting plants, but they should still be seedless Concord grapes.
I'd say 'they will' instead of 'they should' but then somebody would pop up with some esoteric reason why this works on every plant in creation EXCEPT Concord grapes.. :) In other words, I'm just being cautious in saying 'should'.
Pat
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Hi. I have been told not to plant then within one or two hundred feet of grapes that are seeded. I don't know why, but that is what they teach at college. I took a pruning class and that was one of the tidbits of information that I remembered.
Dwayne

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That's good information to know Dwayne, since I have a seeded vine within 200 feet of my seedless vines.
Still would like to know if the seedless cuttings will produce seedless grapes. Is cuttings the method of choice for seedless grape propagation?

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Greg wrote:

Your seedless cuttings will grow up to produce seedless grapes, just like the mother plant that the cuttings came from. Sometimes grapes are grafted to a better root variety. This is done only when there is a specific problem with growing a grape in its own roots. Most propagation is with cuttings as you have done.
As far as the 200 ft rule, I've never heard of that before. I know that if seedless cucumbers are pollinated by a seedy variety of cucumber, the seedless one will have seeds too. I didn't think it worked that way with grapes but I suppose it's possible.
Steve
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Someone toold me that planting them too close will produce very small soft seed things in the seedless grapes.
Dwayne

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Some "seedless" grapes are known to produce those soft seeds. I have read that Venus is prone to that and my Venus does, in fact, have small seeds in some of the grapes. They are small enough to be easily edible and they often stay with the stem when you pull the grape loose. In my case, cross pollination with a seeded variety isn't the cause because I have no seeded variety on my property. I'm pretty sure I'm the only one in the neighborhood with any grapes at all.
Steve
Dwayne wrote:

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