Savory? Sorrel?


As many others, I am now planning my garden (I am in zone 5), and saw someone post about basil vs. oregano. I have a similar question - what does one use savory and sorrel for? I love herbs, but have no idea what to to with them. I can goggle for an answer, but thought this group might have better answers.
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I use savory in red meat dishes. Sorrel I understand is a salad green but I've never eaten it.
--
K.

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Sorrel is great in soup. You can melt some in butter and mix in boiled cream and it makes a good sauce for fish. It has a wonderful lemony flavor which will brighten any appropriate dish. It would be good mixed into a mesclun salad as well.
Doll is Mine wrote:

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|> |> As many others, I am now planning my garden (I am in zone 5), and saw |> someone post about basil vs. oregano. I have a similar question - what |> does one use savory and sorrel for? I love herbs, but have no idea what |> to to with them. I can goggle for an answer, but thought this group |> might have better answers. See the Edible Herb FAQ!
As others have posted, sorrel makes an excellent sour soup, adds acidity to salads and makes an excellent source sauce (very good with pork, duck and other fat meats). If you remove the stem and sweat it down (like spinach), it freezes well.
Winter savory can be used much like a slightly more bitter thyme - hyssop is more bitter still - but I assume that you mean summer savory. It is called "bohnenkraut" in German, and is THE herb to add to bean dishes - especially dried bean salads, but pretty well any bean dish. And, as posted, you can add it to most savoury dishes.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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Doll is Mine wrote:

I don't have savory, but the interest of sorrel is that you have it very early and very late (we usually have sorrel soup for Thanksgiving, and also in march). sorrel soup is, IMHO, best when you blend potatoes boiled in stock with fresh sorrel (do it quickly so the sorrel does not cook). add seasonings to taste (I cook also an onion with the potatoes, and add cayenne and salt). It is also a perennial that is untroubled by soil, partial shade and general neglect. We use it also in tomato chowders through the summer. Though I like strong flavored greens, I find it a bit too tart for my taste in salads.
being another zone 5 dweller, my advice is to have as many hardy perennial herbs as possible (another pro-oregano point in the great debate). not only they are as good as (or better, like oregano vs basil), you also have them in spring and fall. I use sage, oregano and thyme about 8 months a year, and they are usable until the ground freezes (dec. 15). our sage-filled roast chickens and red cabbage salads liberally loaded with thyme lift our spirits in nov.-dec.. In the spring, one of my two oreganos is up and running by april 1.
of course, we drink mint and lemon balm tea from our patch through the year, and these are herbs that you appreciate mostly in the winter.
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The german word for Savory (normally Summer Savory) is "Bonenkraut" -- literally "Bean Spice". Try it in Green Beans!
Rich McKinney
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For a quick sandwich, to some fresh bread add a slice of cheese and a few fresh leaves of French sorrel. Use the leaves whole; salt to taste.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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