Recipe - Bulgur Tabouli

This is the recipe of the month to go out in our September food co-op newsletter. It is delicious and such a wonderful summer dish. I only make it when the garden is productive because store-bought veggies just don't do it justice. Use whatever is in your garden that might be compatible; no one ever "sticks to the recipe." It is better the next day after when all the flavors have had a chance to blend (and with the sweetest tomatoes as well!).
Enjoy.
- - RECIPE OF THE MONTH, BULGUR TABOULI - - -
Bulgur wheat is one of the original convenience foods: a fast-cooking grain prepared by partially boiling (parboiling) durum wheat, which is then dried and debranned. Valued for its high protein content, durum or , "hard" wheat is a prized crop of the inland northwest. Here it is used as the main ingredient in a variation on a traditional Lebanese salad, whose only non-local ingredients are lemon and olive oil. Take advantage of our late summer garlic, mint, parsley and tomatoes!
Ingredients          Bulgur wheat (approximately one cup per serving)          Olive oil          Lemon juice (fresh or bottled)          Minced garlic (chopped very fine)          Minced parsley (chopped very fine)          Minced mint (chopped very fine)          Cubed tomatoes (1/2" pieces or to taste)          Other vegetables such as green onions, or diced cucumbers are optional. Instructions     1     Measure out bulgur wheat by volume     2     Boil an equal amount of water by volume     3     Remove water from heat and add bulgur, then let sit thirty minutes     4     Mix equal parts olive oil, lemon juice and garlic     5     After thirty minutes, mix these thoroughly into bulgur     6     Let sit and chill overnight to "set" flavors     7     Add fresh herbs and tomatoes to fluffed bulgur thirty minutes before serving     8     Leftover tabouli, like good stew, is more flavorful after a day or two
Traditional Lebanese tabouli is much more of a "green" and herb-based dish, but this variant makes for a cooling, late-summer salad or entree (in sufficient quantity). Taking very little prep time and keeping well for days, it can easily become a low-hassle, hot-weather favorite.
- - - HERB OF THE MONTH, PARSLEY - - -
    Parsley is a common herb, both fresh and dried. Notoriously difficult to start from seed, planted parsley starts grow quickly, making it a popular herb in Clark County kitchen gardens. Parsley leaves can be harvested with scissors as needed for soups, salads and as a garnish. Available in many varieties, a flat-leafed version is often used in Asian cuisine, with the familiar curly-leafed "Italian" parsley traditional in the west because it was easy to distinguish from edible chervil or poisonous conium. As a garnish, parsley can also double as an after-dinner breath mint. A cousin to the carrot, parsley is also one of a few common herbs whose seeds are also used as a spice, with the roots of some varieties eaten in eastern Europe. Pinching the flowers off of biennial parsley may retard this biennial's natural life cycle for a year, and entire plants can be cut and hung indoors from their stems to dry for winter use.
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wrote:

We always use onion, in addition to what you say, minus mint (she doesn't care for the mint).......often we add finely diced celery, sometimes cumin. Gralic is not a bad additon, sometimes I toss in a couple of minced cloves.
Try it, you'll like it. (old commercial)
Charlie
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