Re: Using bones for fertilizer?

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Yes, there are horrors in the killfloors (slaughterhouses) of this nation.
I may be even more horrified than a normal person, since I raise cattle and *like* cows. When we work our cows, we *never* yell or jump around. It stresses the animals. The SO and I use mostly hand signals when we work the animals on foot. (Like putting the calves in the weaning pen. We drive the whole herd into the corrals, then sort the cows, steers and bulls out and let them out of a gate, one by one. No yelling allowed. And we don't allow dogs around our cows.)
We're going to start construction on our own slaughterhouse, here on the ranch pretty soon. We don't like taking our cull cows to the state killfloor. All of the stockgrowers in the area will be able to use our killfloor and work their own cattle up, for resale. It'll be DEC certified. None of us like the common practices in commercial killfloors, even the good ones, because we all like cows...
Jan
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Some of you may be interested in this article by Dr. Temple Grandin, an autistic woman who has made a career of designing more humane slaughterhouses. It's long, but fascinating. http://www.grandin.com/inc/visual.thinking.html
Sue snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net Zone 6, Southcentral PA

killfloor.
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 00:06:27 GMT, "SugarChile"

We're really getting way afield .... but there's a basic disconnect to her, to my way of thinking. It's creepy, weird ... IMHO.
Her guiding principle seems to be: "I care about animals, therefore I'll spend my career finding better, gentler ways to kill them." An analogy would be a concentration camp commandant thinking of kinder, gentler ways to kill people - maybe gas ovens.
It seems to me that people who truly care about animals don't spend their careers finding ways to kill them - not even gentler ways.
I think Jan's attitude about doing their own killing is responsible and humane. The cows will have a decent life and a decent death. Everything's got to die sometime, but I object to the USA's more usual way of raising and killing livestock.
Pat
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 16:38:05 GMT, "SugarChile"

Let's hope - and buy locally grown-food whenever we can.

That's true.
Pat
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Well, that explains a lot to me. A neighbor married a gal from Oxford, England. She's in what I call her "earth muffin" phase. Grows a *huge* garden and has a huge flock of laying hens. And she keeps bee hives. They live on 20 or 30 acres. Victoria told me how much her mom's tiny house in Oxford is worth, and explained that England is *full* of people. I've heard the same thing from Germans -- that the reason they love Alaska so much is all the "empty" land up here. Germany has a village every 5 km, and land is very dear over there, too.
Jan
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Probably about $$$.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Bpyboy) wrote:

That is one of my all-time favorite gardening books. My dad used to do that in his garden and he always had fabulous gardens.
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It is a really good book . I aquired mine one x-mas, when a nutty cousin (he's still nuts) gave it to me from his back pack when he realized that he didn't bring me gift for the holiday. I read it, and a couple by Bradford Angier (especially "How to live in the woods on pennies a day) and they shaped a lot of views.
what's driving me nuts these days is that, as a student, I don't really have a place to invest a lot of time and things into. just to move in a year or so.
I'm here to help out with my tiny little garden, and try to amass info from everyone for when this firewalk is over.
john
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Bpyboy) wrote:

You might try bonsai until you are able to settle in one place. :)
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On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 23:10:35 -0500, Phaedrine Stonebridge

Nothing wrong with container gardening either. I've grown an awful lot of veggies and herbs in containers.
Pat
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Bpyboy) wrote:

Oh dear! I did not mean to open up a festering wound. But I have to admit that is pretty funny. My DH started his bonsai habit when he was in school and, although he did not keep it up, he learned a lot about plants. We still have tons of copper wire from those days but the plants are long gone (a sad story). He favored Zelcovas.
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You know, that wire, if it's the imported stuff, the copper coated aluminum that is really soft and easy to use, is getting quite expensive.
And another thing I learned. DO NOT use your father in law's concave bonsai cutter as a wire cutter!
Anyways, I have some REALLY nice maples going now. I grew them to about 15' tall, then hacked them off to about 2', then back to 1' the following year. About half of them died in the process, but after root pruning and potting, they have huge trunks. Once the wounds heal up, they should be wonderful.
I think some of the photos are still up on the website that I have not been maintaining lately at
www.orchidsbymandw.com
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Hi All, the only trouble with composting bones is that they take a long time to decompose. I have found them in compost that is two years old, and taken them out and transfered them to a new compost heap. hope this helps you.
Richard M. Watkin.

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yes it's great. my father would by bone meal. looks like baby powder. he used it for starting roots, seedlings, tansplanting & grafting. he had the best vegys, fruit & flowers around..
ZZ
.
~~<>< <*((((-< . <><
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