Question regarding transplanting tomatoes

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Andy asks:
This coming spring, when I am transplanting Celebrity tomatoes from the little flats I get from Home Deopt into my garden, I plan to do the following:
Dig a larger and deeper hole than normal by about 6 inches.
In the bottom of the hold put a rusty, flattened tin can and some chicken scraps, with bone, from the table.
Put on potting soil or compost for an inch or two, then the tomato plant as per normal......
The idea behind this is that the rusty tin can will add trace elements of iron, and the chicken scraps will rot and provide nitrogen and calcium as the roots grow deeper.
Has anyone tried anything like this, and can anyone comment on whether this is a reasonable idea ?
Just experimenting,
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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In article

Native americans used fish for corn and beans.
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Peace! Om

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Omelet wrote:

Andy comments:
Yes, but I can find nothing on what sort of animal they buried for tomatoes :>)))))
...... besides, if I have a fish, why would I need corn and beans.???.. :>)))))
My thanks to all those who replied. My interpretation is that what I am proposing can't hurt, might help, is easy to do...... so I'm going to give it a shot...... If I get any giant tomatoes, I'll report my results......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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In article <8bbfb6a4-9846-4e8a-b200-

Because a fish will feed you for a day and dried corn, beans and squash, along with the fish you've preserved will feed you in midwinter?
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says...

They dried the fish for winter. I read somewhere they used the fish heads and entrails for fertilizer, not the entire fish unless they had a real glut.
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I was trying out a smart-ass reformulation of "Teach a man to fish...".
IIRC you are correct, though my recollection goes back 40mumble something+ years to grade school history.
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In article

Please do. :-)
I just mentioned the fish as Medina products are very good and I believe they sell a fish meal.
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Hi Andy, My dad was a soil chemist(agronomist) at Purdue, PennSt, Umass & Rutgers. He planted tomatoes this way: dig a hole about 1 ft deep, drop a small handful of 10-10-10 in with about 1 - 3 inches of soil on top of it, mix the soil and fert, pack it down put more loose soil in and plant tomatoes up to their bottom leaves. Water well. When the roots reach that fertilizer they take off growing. The submerged stem up to the bottom leaves will also sprout roots. It makes for a healthy plant with a good headstart. Good luck with the 'mater!!!! Nan in DE
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Hmmm. I've thought about doing that with the metal, but haven't yet. I think steel wool would do better as it has much more surface area. The chicken can't hurt.
Robert in the hills of Tennessee

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hi group.. mind my posting? MY dogs would have all the tomatoes dug up
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as well as other scavengers (coyotes, skunks, raccoons, opossums, etc., etc...) Leave out the chicken IMHO. Steve
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Or add the chicken after it's properly composted. ;-)
That is what composting is for imho.
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:
:> :> > hi group.. mind my posting? :> > MY dogs would have all the tomatoes dug up.... :> as well as other scavengers (coyotes, skunks, raccoons, opossums, etc., :> etc...) Leave out the chicken IMHO. :> Steve : :Or add the chicken after it's properly composted. ;-) : :That is what composting is for imho.
Mainly what I do is dig out all the soil of my tomato bed down about 2 feet (yes, I don't rotate my crops), put the soil out on my concrete patio, I sprinkle a little 5-10-5 or similar and mix it all up with a generous pile of my homemade compost and refill the trench. Been getting bumper crops consistently.
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wrote:

Tongue in cheek: Andy, if the tin cans came from China, can you be sure they really do contribute iron? The chicken bones will probably only contribute massive amounts of antibiotics :-))) Emma
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I use dried crushed egg shells in the bottom of the hole for transplanting tomatoes.
JonquilJan
Learn something new every day As long as you are learning, you are living When you stop learning, you start dying
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wrote:

Food cans are usually tin or aluminum. There are far better and less toxic ways to get trace minerals into your soil.

Bones take years to compost and release their minerals into the soil. I suspect the meat in the soil won't rot fast enough to release the nutrients the plants need either, but I can't swear to it. I would be concerned about encouraging harmful bacteria like botulism to grow by creating an anaerobic environment with the buried meat.

It sounds like a good way to ruin your garden to me. Stick with the compost and lose the tin cans and meat.
Penelope
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Seems like most food cans I've seen will hold a magnet, therefore are steel. I don't know about the tin.... maybe the steel has a very thin layer of tin to prevent rust. I do know that tin is a pretty expensive metal & would be surprised if it were on food cans.

Perhaps. I've buried lots of rotting chicken parts in my garden & have had zero problems. Maybe I just have a cast iron stomach. :-)
Robert in the hills of Tennessee
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wrote:
:Perhaps. I've buried lots of rotting chicken parts in my garden & have had :zero problems. Maybe I just have a cast iron stomach. :-) : :Robert in the hills of Tennessee
The soil is a good place to decompose things. I don't have a shredder and put some fairly coarse things in my compost pile and if they haven't decomposed by planting time I just work them into the ground regardless. By next season they have decomposed and can't be found, consumed by soil organisms and my plants.
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Penelope wrote:

Andy writes:
That's incorrect. You can tell by using a magnet. Beer cans are aluminum. NOTHING is made of "tin", since tin is much much more expensive than iron...So is aluminum , for that matter.
We burn our trash here. When the cans are dumped onto the ground, and it rains a couple times, they are covered with rust --- iron oxide. THAT is the iron bearing nutrient that leaches into the soil for the plants.,
Bones are heavy in calcium, and do not need to "decompose". They are already in the form needed by the plants. Just a little leaching .
Regarding botulism..... Botulism does not appear from the air "magically". Meat does not naturally contain botulism, and the only source would be from the dirt. If the dirt contains botulism spores anyway, a piece of chicken won't matter...
I think you are too cautious in your approach.
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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sometime in the recent past AndyS posted this:

Most composting frowns on using fatty meat bits as they attract flies & other vermin besides all that protein breakdown problems. IF you put chicken bones in your garden, you will attract dogs, skunks, raccoons, bears and any other host of critters. Been there & done that. I suggest some bone meal as in Rose food if you want to go the bone way, otherwise, roast the bones, crush them up and go that way.
Tin cans, now that's just silly. Research the Fe needs of your vegetables and you'll find most will do nicely without it. It is usually added to help make your soil more acid - remember 'Mir-Acid?'
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