planting seeds in a "no-till" garden"

Hi folks, I have what may be a silly question but here goes;
If I want to switch over to a "no-till" method of gardening and use newspaper and mulch...what method of plating seeds would I use...(as opposed to cutting holes in the paper to place small plants)? Would I just layer the newspapers side by side leaving a small 'row' in between them? Thanks, Scott p.s. I would also like some good recommendations and sources for rock powder amendments
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you can't plant seeds in mulch, so when you use no-till you have to get organized (in the past I had some luck with leaves which were almost decomposed, but nowadays prefer less decomposed leaves for better mulching). Typically leaves or newspaper completely disappear in one year, and next year you should be able to plant seeds there. If you mulch with, say, woodchips, they will take two (or more) years to disappear, so you will have to make sure that bed is used for seedlings in the next two years at least.
I tend to keep only a small part of my garden unmulched, and often I plant lettuce in one of the unmulched parts, and then transplant it to a mulched area once it has grown a bit. I tend to follow a rotation that takes into account which plants go with which kind of mulch. For example, garlic always follows tomatoes in wood chips, and transplanted chicory follows garlic. Lettuce, chard and brassicas alternate in manure-leaves mulches. The unmulched parts are where leaves have disintegrated and they host a variety of salad greens which are broadcast directly.
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