Planting out

Hi,
I have just bought some young plants (tomatoes, red chilli, swee pepper, courgette, french beans) directly from the growers o www.plantconnection.co.uk, but have a dilemma. We live 1000 foot abov sea level and are facing the incoming atlantic winds. How much should we delay planting the plants outside as nature up her seems to be lagging a few weeks behind the valley.
Ann
-- AnnaF
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Can you put up some fencing that will hold plastic sheeting? You can make a windbreak. We have to do that quite a bit, here in coastal Alaska.
Jan
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Anna,
If you can provide protection for your plants from excess wind/heat/ cold you should be able to plant out immediately. If you will be having overnight lows in the 40s, peppers and courgettes may not appreciate that too much.
I am using the "tomato cages" you can buy - the 3 foot ones that taper out at the top - as mini-cloches for my peppers. I have had overnight lows in the 40s and my plants have been out a week. They are doing well and look terrific. I stick the cage in over the plant and wrap it with plastic - open at the top. Keeps the winds out, we had gusts to 30 a few days ago, all day - old news for your location I'm sure.
Good luck!
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snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com.REMOVETHIS.BIT says...

If you have neighbours with successful gardens at your altitude, why not ask them?
They'd know the area, wind, weather, soil and planting times.
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That's advice that many people overlook for way too long. Ask the old timers what works and what doesn't.
But don't always believe everything they say. The homesteaders out here said we're too high in elevation to grow raspberries. Then a bunch of Old Believer Russians moved into the neighborhood and immediately planted big raspberry patches that thrived. Now everyone grows them.
I planted a couple of apple trees last year. The old timers say we're too high for apples. We'll see...
Jan in Alaska USDA Zone 3
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snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net says...

The stories I look for are experiential and real. I usually take them as cautionary, not prohibitive.
Anything that hasn't been tried is open to being tried. Anything that has failed, might work with a little ingenuity.

What variety?
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Yup. That's what makes gardening so interesting : )

A Yellow Transparent and a Norland. Both varieties do really well down in town, at the lower elevations. I'm up at 1600' and pushing it, so the trees are tucked into warm little microclimates in my yard.
Jan at 59N, 151W
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