Peppers

Page 2 of 2  


I don't think it is the seeds and I love these peppers. With the amount of foliage on the plants and the fact that I packed them into the garden too tight makes me think it is the other problems. This year I will make some changes and see what happens. Thanks for a ll the input MJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

ok, we planted 20 green pepper plants in an area of about 6x6ft.
we had three crops totaling around 300 peppers.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I planted 18 habenero plants in a 6x6ft area and learned a big lesson - that is plant your peppers in a north to south columns with 2ft intervals. But from east to west, you'll need at least 3 ft. That's 12 plants in a 6x6 garden.
I had two 6x6 garden plots and the 12 plant garden out produced the 18 plant garden.
If you planted early, mid and late season Bell peppers, you might get away with overcrowding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Adams wrote:

Planting in north-south rows is preferred for all veges that need full sun. [Of course in the antipodes we plant in south-north rows!]
Whether you can get away with overcrowding depends on which resource is the limiting factor for growth. If sunlight is not the limit then with better soil you can plant closer than with poorer.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wierd things happen when you're born upside down. ;)

You are obviously currect in spite of your reverse polarity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As long as you're an antipodinal, I'd like to tell you of my mate, Simon. The little bugger died owing me 3 slabs of bitters. Someone suggested I have his head stone engraved "He died like a true Australian" ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Adams wrote:

You mean he died much younger than the white man of largely preventable diseases, excessive consumption of intoxicants and inadequate medical services?
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wrong on all descriptors. He had a congenital form of muscular dystropathy, drank less than a six pack a week, didn't smoke legal or illegal stuff, and had more than adequate medical services. He even got more exercise than the average patient with his disease. This included participation in wheel chair sports and gardering via a raised garden bed. Of course, he suffered from the largely unpreventable antipod disorder of upsidedownitis.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 29, 6:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

My Gosh, all this about peppers. I am exausted. Gee what else can I start?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ah you meant that Simon. We had a wake for him and there were 3 slabs with a note give these to Dick if he shows up. Well being aussie beer we had to turn it upside down and it all ran out, luckily we were able to catch most of it.
Thanks for the beer .
Mike
PS If he only managed to drink 3 slabs more than you he wasn't a "true Australian"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Habanero peppers generally do better in a regular or raised garden bed, and they love the heat and the sun, so choose a sunny location. If you don't have access to a garden plot, you can successfully grow habanero peppers in containers, making these tasty treats a great choice for apartment dwellers. Habanero peppers also can be grown in indoors with the help of an 'indoor gardening' (http://tinyurl.com/7nt98mw ) system, such as the popular AeroGarden.
--
allen73


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

Pepper plants like to hold hands. You should space them so that when the plants mature, their leaves are just touching one another.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Adams wrote: ...

it was three crops from a single planting, raised bed, full sun, heavy clay soil, no mulch, no fertilizer, soil amended with organic materials only the previous fall. watered when dry for longer than a week.
they could take a fair bit of abuse. the 2nd harvest was so thick and often wrapped around stems that a fair bit of damage was done in the process. still didn't stop them from putting on another round of growth and fruits.
we had a lot of heat and sunshine last summer, i'm sure that helped too.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why? Your plant requires a steady supply of N throughout its life cycle. A BALANCED fertilizer, ie.a 5-5-5 or a 10-10-10 is strongly recommended by most Ag experts. These garden variety pseudo- scientists are stupidly attempting to infer you do not need N when the plant begins to set fruit, when in fact it is EXCESS nitrogen, as well as other factors, such as soil and climate that affects the vegatative phase. Cutting out N is ludicrous in any viable nutrient management program.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com;951574 Wrote: > I just read that spraying Epsom Salt on pepper plants and re applying

Epsom salt is most commonly used on pepper, tomato and rose plants. This is because epsom salt is made from magnesium. Many pepper plants are planted in soil that is deficient in magnesium. The magnesium from the epsom salt is quickly absorbed by the plant to give it the nourishment it needs to grow. The epsom salt can be applied in spray form for the best results. Do not simply rely on epsom salt if your soil has a severe deficiency in magnesium. It will work, however, for low to moderate deficiencies. Spray the epsom salt solution on the pepper plants again when they first begin to flower.
--
allen73


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may want to wait to see if your plants show any signs of magnesium deficiency. The classic deficiency symptom is interveinal chlorosis of the lower/older leaves. However, the first symptom is generally a more pale green color that may be more pronounced in the lower/older leaves. In some plants, the leaf margins will curve upward or turn a red-brown to purple in color. Full season symptoms include preharvest leaf drop, weakened stalks, and long branched roots. Conifers will exhibit yellowing of the older needles, and in the new growth the lower needles will go yellow before the tip needles.
If you want to have fun with cations, look at <http://soils.tfrec.wsu.edu/webnutritiongood/soilprops/04CEC.htm
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What makes this a fallacy is the word : MANY: as in ..."Many pepper plants are planted in soil that is deficient in magnesium."
It is safe to say there are MANY soils that are not, so again; Test your soil if you are unsure and/or only add Mg if it is actually needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.